Comments about Langston Hughes

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magpiesentiment: I loved my friend. He went away from me. There is nothing more to say. The poem ends, Soft as it began, I loved my friend. - To F.S. by Langston Hughes

natalyjara: «For poems are like rainbows; they escape you quickly.» - Langston Hughes, The Big Sea.

PeterKansiime: “Hold fast to your dreams, for without them life is a broken winged bird that cannot fly.” —Langston Hughes

_kingroger: “Negroes, sweet and docile Meek, humble, and kind.. Beware of the day they change their mind.” - Langston Hughes

rabihalameddine: Poem before that: The Dream Keeper by Langston Hughes

LwamG: “What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun? Or fester like a sore And then run? Does it stink like rotten meat? Or crust and sugar over like a syrupy sweet? Maybe it just sags like a heavy load. Or does it explode?” Harlem, by Langston Hughes

BeineckeLibrary: Langston Hughes Papers: 305 linear feet (673 boxes). Gift of Langston Hughes, ca. 1940-67, and bequest of estate. Finding aid and link to digitized images:

BeineckeLibrary: Langston Hughes: "To You"

WTHisRheaDoing: It’s absolutely one thing to get good feedback from your peers but it’s something about getting awesome feedback from writing professors. My professor had me thinking I was the next Langston Hughes.

BT4u2c: We have discovered that there are ways of getting almost anywhere we want to go, if we really want to go there. - Langston Hughes

MotivatBt: Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken winged bird that cannot fly. By - Langston Hughes

BeineckeLibrary: I, Too by Langston Hughes, read by Willie Jennings

AHA1R: The Dream Keeper by Langston Hughes

BeineckeLibrary: Tired by Langston Hughes

iHamedh937: “Let the rain kiss you. Let the rain beat upon your head with silver liquid drops. Let the rain sing you a lullaby” - Langston Hughes

Hamraaz00957882: This is why I gave up my name, in fact. Bc Langston Hughes is right.

BeineckeLibrary: Youth by Langston Hughes, read by Willie Jennings

scoobEdont: My favorite play. Based on a Langston Hughes poem. I got to read Walter’s part in high school English Lit. Come to think of it, in today’s schools, you may not be able to present it soon. The content is still true, and possibly becoming worse.

OmairBhat: “ When poems stop talking about the moon and begin to mention poverty, trade unions, color, color lines and colonies, somebody tells the police ” – Langston Hughes

bilalsquiat2: ngl lie to you bro, i was shopping around and finally found something i liked just for it not to be in my size and immediately quoted Harlem by Langston Hughes

Poem2Poem: It was a long time ago. / I have almost forgotten my dream. - Langston Hughes

cgeclectics: “Hold fast to dreams, For if dreams die Life is a broken-winged bird, That cannot fly.” ― Langston Hughes

BeineckeLibrary: Langston Hughes: "Harlem" from One-Way Ticket

BelindaGreb: "Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken-winged bird that cannot fly." Langston Hughes

Poem2Poem: Well, son, I'll tell you: / Life for me ain't been no crystal stair. - Langston Hughes

ayeshabintrazaa: “When poems stop talking about the moon and begin to mention poverty, trade unions, color, color lines and colonies, somebody tells the police". – Langston Hughes

tweetz789: Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken winged bird that cannot fly.- Langston Hughes

IBJIYONGI: In case anyone has wondered why part of the subtitle of my book is a reference to Langston Hughes's Montage of a Dream Deferred

IAM_BarryObama: We are the people Langston Hughes wrote of who “build our temples for tomorrow, strong as we know how.” We are the

BrokenSpineArts: Langston Hughes and Maleness

Poem2Poem: Let America be America again. / Let it be the dream it used to be. - Langston Hughes

BeineckeLibrary: Langston Hughes Papers: 305 linear feet (673 boxes). Gift of Langston Hughes, ca. 1940-67, and bequest of estate. Finding aid and link to digitized images:

tothemax2050: Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken winged bird that cannot fly. —Langston Hughes

Littmus_Lozenge: "I am the young man, full of strength and hope, Tangled in that ancient endless chain Of profit, power, gain, of grab the land! Of grab the gold! Of grab the ways of satisfying need! Of work the men! Of take the pay! Of owning everything for one’s own greed!" - Langston Hughes

WZRDPlaylist: Langston Hughes, The U.S., And Imperialism by Howard Zinn

WZRDPlaylist: Perspectives from Poetry: Langston Hughes's Columbia by Howard Zinn

w_synergy: “Hold fast to dreams, For if dreams die Life is a broken-winged bird, That cannot fly.” ― Langston Hughes

magpiesentiment: I loved my friend. He went away from me. There is nothing more to say. The poem ends, Soft as it began, I loved my friend. - To F.S. by Langston Hughes

ToddHamer: “Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken winged bird that cannot fly.” —Langston Hughes

rohsrecords: New music released today! The Child of A Creek/ Fallen "Our Dreams Will Be Told" Album

love_an_artist: Art Educators! It is our responsibility to TEACH this! Too often revolutionary artists/movements who were deeply political like Kahlo, The Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes, the Dada movement, etc are taught but their political motivations are left out. This is erasure.

love_an_artist: Kahlo was a Marxist. The Harlem Renaissance was at its core a political arts movement. Langston Hughes wrote political poetry. The Dada movement was QUEER AF. If we are leaving these stories out of the narrative of Art History we are upholding patriarchal white supremacy.

BeineckeLibrary: Langston Hughes Papers Explore finding aid and thousands and thousands of digitized images:

DixieChinaski: "or does it explode?" -Langston Hughes

UCFblackbird: UCF Coaching Staff Doing Well with Recruiting Georgia, Including Langston Hughes HS | Inside the Knights

keenessays: 1. Read “Theme for English B” by Langston Hughes very carefully. 2. Write your o

tweetz789: Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken winged bird that cannot fly.- Langston Hughes

ericabuddington: It was also produced by the first Black play producer, Canada Lee. Here is a picture of Arna Bontemps, Paul Robeson, Canada Lee, and Langston Hughes discussing the production in 1946.

brokenbeatnik: “Negroes, Sweet and docile, Meek, humble and kind: Beware the day They change their mind!” -Langston Hughes

__haitianprince: I, Too - Langston Hughes

shadlen: Lorraine Hansberry would have turned 92 today. She died when I was 5, but she led me to Langston Hughes a decade later (with nudges from my parents). I wonder where we would be today had she lived longer.

SeanSingerPoet: Langston Hughes

ScottAndPark: During this time, Hansberry wrote The Crystal Stair, a play about a struggling black family in Chicago, which was later renamed A Raisin in the Sun, a line from a Langston Hughes poem.

NOLAPSchools: Today we highlight Felice Gaddis, a licensed professional counselor & CIS Senior Site Coordinator at Langston Hughes Academy. Ms. Gaddis coordinates community resources that help students successfully learn & prepare for their next academic & career chapters in life. Thank you!

BrainiacsWorld: 4\ Hansberry wrote The Crystal Stair, a play about a struggling Black family in Chicago, which was later renamed A Raisin in the Sun, a line from a Langston Hughes poem.

BeineckeLibrary: "I am the author of a three act dramatic play ... I have tentatively chosen as a title ... a line from one of your poems ... 'a raisin in the sun'" Lorraine Hansberry to Langston Hughes, LH Papers

mbali__vilakazi: At the entrance of the Homecoming Centre at the District Six Museum you will encounter a plaque with an excerpt from the poem 'Dreams' by poet Langston Hughes:

Poem2Poem: I went down to the river, / I set down on the bank. / I tried to think but couldn't - Langston Hughes

BeineckeLibrary: Envelope for tickets for Langston Hughes to opening night performance of A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry on Broadway in 1959, from LH Papers

gradesaverr: Write research paper discussing the “Theme for English B” by Hughes, Langston poem

halfmadeup: It's so funny how Langston Hughes pulled one over the authorities by just playing dumb

daBookdragon: Langston Hughes was always on FIRE anytime he wrote about democracy, equality, and the long road ahead to ACTUALLY achieving it for everyone.

SliceOfAppPie: However, People of Color are so misrepresented that AI can never imitate Langston Hughes or Maya Angelou. If you are afraid of a creative takeover by machines, my point is to continue to have empathy and generosity, and you cannot lose to a machine.

Steve_Lipton: However, People of Color are so misrepresented that AI can never imitate Langston Hughes or Maya Angelou. If you are afraid of a creative takeover by machines, my point is to continue to have empathy and generosity, and you cannot lose to a machine.

AidanHynes5: What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up Like a raisin in the sun? - Langston Hughes (1902-1967)

HarassNoMore: “Hold fast to dreams, For if dreams die Life is a broken-winged bird, That cannot fly.” ~ Langston Hughes

zhionny74: “I wish the rent was heaven sent.” ~ Langston Hughes

1RunningMummy: We read this poem for school today (homeschool), and it made me think of how this is still waiting to happen. The poem is by Langston Hughes. I, Too I, too, sing America. I am the darker brother. They send me to eat in the kitchen When company comes, But I laugh,

wales_martino: He Physically Resembles James Mercer Langston Hughes In A Way..

welfordwrites: An artist must be free to choose what he does, certainly, but he must also never be afraid to do what he might choose. Langston Hughes

jasonintrator: European theorists avoid the label since they regard Americans as too dumb to be fascists. But Black American intellectuals have always used the term from Du Bois and Langston Hughes on

XyrisRae3: “I loved my friend, he went away from me there is nothing more to say, this poem ends as soft as it began, I loved my friend” -Langston Hughes

magpiesentiment: I loved my friend. He went away from me. There is nothing more to say. The poem ends, Soft as it began, I loved my friend. - To F.S. by Langston Hughes

tweetz789: Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken winged bird that cannot fly.- Langston Hughes

janetheeesq: i called the John Langston Bar Association the Langston Hughes Bar Association in a meeting today if you’re wondering how effectively my brain has been working

tweetz789: Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken winged bird that cannot fly.- Langston Hughes

ToddBohannon: “The Dream Keeper” by Langston Hughes “Bring me all of your dreams, You dreamers, Bring me all of your Heart melodies That I may wrap them Away from the too-rough fingers Of the world”

ThisCantBeSafe: I’m really, really enjoying this book. Reading Langston Hughes with adult eyes is a real treat. Read half of it today, may actually finish it tonight.

jamari_oneal: "O, let America be America again— The land that never has been yet— And yet must be—the land where every man is free." Langston Hughes said it better than I ever could.

Stormblessed545: Today is a good day to read Langston Hughes and cry.

PhilReality: Langston Hughes parking Harlem is nice and the niggas is out chile.

TchKimPossible: Popo and Fifina, first bestselling book featuring children of the diaspora by Langston Hughes & Arna Bontemps

WERANowPlaying: The Langston Hughes Project - "Border Line"

OGvibedealer: Man s/o my elementary school art and reading teachers not only did they inspire me aesthetically ( one dressed like Maxine Shaw the other like Patti Smith) they put me on to Basquiat and Georgia Okeefe and Langston Hughes and Maya Angelou. I still see those influences in my work

Joe_GolbergStan: My Langston Hughes essay was a banger now I’m bouta fro the remix featuring Mary Angelou

LangstonReview: Seitu’s World: The Langston Hughes Story For Black History Month At Mount Pleasant Christian Academy In Harlem

PrateekJadhav99: “I have discovered in life that there are ways of getting almost anywhere you want to go, if you really want to go.” -Langston Hughes

theSlowBroke: "Hold fast to dreams, For if dreams die Life is a broken-winged bird, That cannot fly." Langston Hughes

Mangakiko12: The UCF Knights Football Coaching Staff Doing Well with Recruiting Georgia, Including Langston Hughes HS

BlkHenesyEnergy: Naw Langston Hughes got me in tears LMFAOOOO

MisterSalesman: What were the framers of the Constitution-- George Washington, James Madison, Franklin, Jefferson, afraid of? Langston Hughes--- "Negroes,. Sweet and docile. Meek, humble, and kind: Beware the day; they change their mind." Wind. In the cotton fields.

hwmag: Seitu’s World: The Langston Hughes Story For Black History Month At Mount Pleasant Christian Academy In Harlem

mobi_estar: Hold fast to dreams For if dreams die Life is a broken-winged bird That cannot fly. Hold fast to dreams For when dreams go Life is a barren field Frozen with snow. Langston Hughes

BeineckeLibrary: Langston Hughes Papers: 305 linear feet (673 boxes). Gift of Langston Hughes, ca. 1940-67, and bequest of estate. Finding aid and link to digitized images:

SeanSingerPoet: Langston Hughes

BasqPhilosopher: The poetry of Langston Hughes was in a anthology of American poetry I read in high school. His poem "Let America be America Again" is striking in its message and effect. More true today than ever.

mininghistory: The article is preceded by a short poem by Langston Hughes that I've not come across before.

magpiesentiment: I loved my friend. He went away from me. There is nothing more to say. The poem ends, Soft as it began, I loved my friend. - To F.S. by Langston Hughes

YoBigRube: Langston Hughes | Poetry Foundation

32ndGP: “What happens to a dream deferred?” Langston Hughes



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