Comments about Hartley Coleridge

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rajoyceUCB: —Hartley Coleridge, “Long time a child, and still a child, when years”

insanehead_: "Is love a fancy, or a feeling?" - Hartley Coleridge. "Is love a fancy, or a feeling, or a Ferrars?" - Marianne Dashwood.

violent_mango: Update on my sad little life nobody asked for: Coleridge the monstera had a child this weekend via propagation and I called it Hartley.

dehgani1: Each one his objects seeks with anxious chase, And I have not a common hope with any: Thus, like one drop of oil upon a flood, In uncommunicating solitude, Single am I amid the countless many. Hartley Coleridge

RonJohncares: "A baffled despot is the vulgarest of dirty wretches no matter whether he be the despot of a nation vindicating its rights or of a donkey sinking under its load .(Hartley Coleridge.1796-1845)

anicolson: Coleridge watches little Hartley:

kl_elliott: But what is freedom? Rightly understood, A universal license to be good. -David Hartley Coleridge (1833)

microbius: 'Bo scratches his wiry bonce, wishes he was a backbench Fabricant, rich, outrageous, and mostly fictional.' as John Clare didn't quite write... from 'British Standards'

cchazmo222: " Out of sight, out of mind. "Tis true of most...we leave behind." - Hartley Coleridge 1796-1849

RoganGranite: The bells ring out; the hoary steeple rocks— Hark! the long story of a score of clocks; For, once a year, the village clocks agree, E'en clocks unite to sound the hour of glee— And every cottage has a light awake, Unusual stars long flicker o'er the lake. ~Hartley Coleridge

MelanieJaxn: The bells ring out; the hoary steeple rocks— Hark! the long story of a score of clocks; For, once a year, the village clocks agree, E'en clocks unite to sound the hour of glee— And every cottage has a light awake, Unusual stars long flicker o'er the lake. ~Hartley Coleridge

MelanieJaxn: So the Old Year—that fond and formal name, Is with us yet, another and the same. Are these less vital than the wave or wind. Or snow that melts and leaves no trace behind? Oh! let them perish all, or pass away, And let our spirits feel a New Year's day. ~Hartley Coleridge

at_oasis: On this hapless earth There ’s small sincerity of mirth, And laughter oft is but an art To drown the outcry of the heart. PS. - Hartley Coleridge

MelanieJaxn: And we, whom many New-Year's days have told The sober truth, that we are growing old— For this one night—aye—and for many more, Will be as jocund as we were of yore, Kind hearts can make December blithe as May, And in each morrow find a New-Year's day. ~Hartley Coleridge

MelanieJaxn: Her very frowns are fairer far, Than smiles of other maidens are. ~Hartley Coleridge

sensitive_bore: lots to amuse in this 1840 letter from charlotte brontë to hartley coleridge, esp the final line

WasteNotTrading: Check out The Dramatic Works of Massinger and Ford by Hartley Coleridge 1839 hardback

arunpillai999: SHE is not fair to outward view, As many maidens be; Her loveliness I never knew Until she smiled on me: O, then I saw her eye was bright A well of love, a spring of light.. -Hartley Coleridge

timetogrowdude: "An affirmation and an act, that bids eternal truth as present fact" Hartley Coleridge, on faith

DiceyPrince_: The English poet Hartley Coleridge penned these insightful words about faith: ‘It is an affirmation and an act, that bids eternal truth be present fact.’ I like a lot.

davynotebooks: We held our first reading group of Davy's notebooks today, looking at 13D, used by Davy in 1800. Discussion included the influence of ST Coleridge & David Hartley on Davy, & the later editorial practice of John Davy in publishing Davy's poems in the 1830s. It was fun!

AngellinaBrady: I went to St Oswald’s Church in Grasmere and spent time sitting next to the grave of someone I know from reading books about his Father. Other visitors were kind to point out that the grave I was seeking , Wordsworth’s was behind me. When I actually came to see Hartley Coleridge

Book_Addict: Happy birthday to English writer and poet Hartley Coleridge (September 19,1796), author of "Worthies of Yorkshire and Lancashire" (1836) et al.

Esteesians: Hartley was Sarah and Samuel’s first child - he lived a kind of charmed life, figuring in Coleridge’s poems and notebooks. Sadly did not prepare him for the reality of a changing England in the 19th century and he spent his adult years as a drifter (although he was a great poet).

conbrunstrom: Hartley Coleridge born OTD in 1796. A life burdened by too much expectation?

Wordsworthians: Coleridge also says his son Hartley "is a poet, spite of the forehead, ' villainously low' which his mother smuggled into his face" 2/2

cchazmo222: " But what is freedom? Rightly understood...a universal license to be good." - Hartley Coleridge 1796-1849

microbius: My contribution involves the poetics of 'The English Strain Project'

Esteesians: Is love a fancy, or a feeling? No. It is immortal as immaculate Truth, ‘Tis not a blossom shed as soon as youth, Drops from the stem of life—for it will grow, In barren regions, where no waters flow. Hartley Coleridge, Sonnet VII

microbius: Transpositions of Hartley Coleridge: the end of my 'English Strain' project, book three: 'British Standards'...

abdlaziz_ghizzi: But what is Freedom? Rightly understood. A universal license to be good.! . Hartley Coleridge

livetolovealone: Spotlight Poetry – The Lily of the Valley – A poem by Hartley Coleridge

H41483608: the poem by Hartley Coleridge

LondonGrip: Hartley Coleridge – Genius Disregarded. Jacob John Shales considers Andrew Keanie’s short study of the life and poetry of the eldest son of Samuel Taylor Coleridge:

STCLetters: On the evening of his arrival Citizen John received the first of many shocks from Hartley Coleridge's being made to kneel at mine and his Mother's Feet, and with his little hands folded, helped out with a part of the Lord's Prayer.

pilgrimrose: 'Stranger, beneath this roof in byegone days Dwelt Coleridge. Here he sang his witching lays Of that strange Mariner, and what befel, In mystic hour, the Lady Christabel...' Ernest Hartley Coleridge, grandson of STC

microbius: Post today on finishing the third book of The English Strain - my sonnet project! Good Friday 1273: Petrarch first claps eyes on Laura! (Books One and Two now both available.)

microbius: The final set features versions of Hartley Coleridge's sonnets (I tried to adopt a Tory voice, but couldn't).

microbius: 'I scripted myself from Burke to Kwarteng,/lockdown reading that locked me down and out!' (HC, sort of) :

microbius: Written today: a treatment of a 4th sonnet by Hartley Coleridge (with video) Temporary post...

ekstrom: The son also rises in this week's sonnet by Hartley Coleridge

microbius: Written today, 'In the Great City we are met Again': a 3rd Hartley Coleridge poem gets the transpositional treatment!! Text, context and minute video...

mazan_pama: "Her very frowns are fairer far Than smiles of other maidens are!" -Hartley Coleridge

plastic_bio: Her very frowns are fairer far Than smiles of other maidens are. - Hartley Coleridge

LRBbookshop: we'll allow it this time but will take a dim view of this sort of metagaming in the future if anyone tries it with hartley coleridge etc

hey_nixi: "Is love a fancy, or a feeling? No. It is immortal as immaculate Truth, 'Tis not a blossom shed as soon as youth, Drops from the stem of life—for it will grow, In barren regions, where no waters flow, Nor rays of promise cheats the pensive gloom" - Sonnet VII, Hartley Coleridge

HobanGirl: The year departs, a blessing on its head, We mourn not for it, for it is not dead: Dead? What is that? A word to joy unknown, Which love abhors, and faith will never own. :: Hartley Coleridge, New Year's Day, Poems, 1833

MelanieJaxn: They come, they go, they change, they do not die. So the Old Year—that fond and formal name, Is with us yet, another and the same. And are the thoughts, that ever more are fleeing, The moments that make up our being's being... ~Hartley Coleridge

MelanieJaxn: The bells ring out; the hoary steeple rocks— Hark! the long story of a score of clocks; For, once a year, the village clocks agree, E'en clocks unite to sound the hour of glee— And every cottage has a light awake, Unusual stars long flicker o'er the lake. ~Hartley Coleridge

annecmccarthy: Hartley Coleridge is all of us.

jewilsn: Is Hartley Coleridge the only child whose chatter we get to know well, among children of famous writers of the 18th & 19th centuries?? Maybe some of Dickens' brood? Oh wait, there's Julian Hawthorne. But...is that all?

multifanloop: "Her very frowns are fairer far Than smiles of other maidens are"-Hartley Coleridge Smile With Aham Sharma

Wordsworthians: 'Hartley Coleridge - 'How the prodigal son of Samuel Taylor Coleridge faced his demons, and his father’s shadow'

rajoyceUCB: —Hartley Coleridge

bhatkins: "But what is Freedom? Rightly understood, A universal licence to be good." -- Hartley Coleridge (1796-1849) Poet

lah_ann: Sonnet IV : Hartley Coleridge : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

PirlCulture: Hartley Coleridge quote

conbrunstrom: Hartley Coleridge born OTD in 1796. A life burdened by too much expectation?

arrroberts: Hartley, the Clockwork Boy:

Book_Addict: Happy birthday English writer and poet Hartley Coleridge (September 19,1796)."Worthies of Yorkshire and Lancashire" (1836) et al.

ArthurLWood: After a spot of lunch, I wandered toward St Oswald's Church to see Wordsworth's grave. Coleridge's son Hartley is buried close by. Here is one of his poems. I then spent some time with The Ode at a secluded spot beside the River Rothay. I simply LOVED Grasmere.

Arlette_Rod: Hartley Coleridge.

sarahkhaled1994: Is love a fancy, or a feeling? No. It is immortal as immaculate Truth, 'Tis not a blossom shed as soon as youth, Drops from the stem of life— for it will grow, In barren regions, where no waters flow, Nor rays of promise cheats the pensive gloom. ― Hartley Coleridge, Sonnet VII.

TallVerse: The temporary union of several currents in one, so as to form the main current of the moment, would present an accurate image of Hartley's theory of the will. - Chapter 6, Biographia Literaria, Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Kayface77: I find it helpful to realize that we are not alone in our doubts, fears and regrets, don't you? Never have been, never will be...❤️ "Keep Buggering On..." -- Winston S. Churchill, 1874 - 1965 Hartley Coleridge ⬇️, 1796 - 1849

somequotesbot: "Mortal! fear no more,— The reign is past of ancient violence; And Jove hath sworn that time shall not deface, Nor death destroy, nor mutability Perplex the truth of love." - Hartley Coleridge

ListentoPoetry: Beautiful poem. Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

Wordsworthians: Coleridge also says his son Hartley "is a poet, spite of the forehead, ' villainously low' which his mother smuggled into his face" 2/2

Doshiba: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

Doshiba: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

ZahidNawal: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

Thefacebookpoet: Excellent analysis of a sonnet in Carol Rumens's POEM OF THE WEEK:

MarkSipps: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

swansblack: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

laoluwa_: "... Nor child, nor man, Nor youth, nor sage, I find my head is grey, For I have lost the race I never ran: A rathe December blights my lagging May; And still I am a child, though I be old: Time is my debtor for my years untold"

AdeleWard: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

LIS4G33: If you like this –

DeSaInTeD: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

JohnWilkinspsyc: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

ellaextra: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

DebsF319: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

WritingLife_b: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

IonaItalia: Fellow Jesuans include Thomas Cranmer, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Thomas Malthus, Laurence Sterne, David Hartley, John Flamsteed, Jacob Bronowski... Founded 1496.

HMcghann: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

girlegunz: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

EmpoweredPoet: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

2020Wordsworth: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

RBLworkerFE: Top story: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge | Books | The Guardian

BooksByKDWaring: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

ShernaKhambatta: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

northangerland: The long and short of the matter is that I am no Oracle of Delphi. I dwell in the twilight land between the world of letters and the world of action, and so may be singularly ill-suited as an advisor. Hartley Coleridge to Branwell Brontë, May 1840

guardian: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

GuardianBooks: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

VonBonakele: No hope I needed, and I knew no fears.

QuibellPaul: Poem of the week: Long Time a Child by Hartley Coleridge

kittensnotkids: I wrote part of my master's thesis about Michael Jackson. The rest of the thesis had to do with JM Barrie & Peter Pan & The Little White Bird, and a bit of Hartley Coleridge. But MJ was really central to that thesis. My thesis readers quite liked it.

ar_ya_nee: "Is love a fancy or feeling, or Ferras?" Marianne - Sense and Sensibility (1998). This is part of a sonnet actually except the "Ferras", Sonnet VII by Hartley Coleridge. I thought it was Shakespeare at first.

preraphaeIist: beam me up hartley coleridge

GrasmereJournal: On Sunday Mr. and Mrs. Coleridge and Hartley came. The day was very warm. We sailed to the foot of Loughrigg. They staid with us three weeks, and till the Thursday following, ie. till the 24th of July.

microbius: Hartley Coleridge's sonnet transposed into today's BRITISH STANDARDS poem (with video)...



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