Comments about Geoffrey Chaucer

Click to write a comment about Geoffrey Chaucer

NostalgicOnline: Check out Canterbury Tales Geoffrey Chaucer 2 Vols The Great Books The Franklin Library

welfordwrites: The Nun's Priest's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. One of the best Canterbury Tales, this is an animal fable in the style of Aesop, and the first example in English literature of the mock-heroic. Click the link!

welfordwrites: The Monk's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. This Canterbury Tale consists of 17 short stories on the theme of “how are the mighty fallen”. Click the link!

AidanCSowa: Time and tide wait for no man. Geoffrey Chaucer

QueeredR: “And high above, depicted in a tower, Sat Conquest, robed in majesty and power, Under a sword that swung above his head, Sharp-edged and hanging by a subtle thread.” ― Geoffrey Chaucer, 'The Canterbury Tales'

TommyPotts14: riverrun, covering Tabard at the day What is the starting point for The Canterbury Tales? Image result The popularity of the Tabard Inn with these pilgrims was no doubt the reason that Geoffrey Chaucer chose it to be starting point for The Canterbury Tales.

QueeredR: The amazing Alberta Hunter - "Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out" “If you are poor your very brother hates you And all your friends avoid you, sad to say.” ― Geoffrey Chaucer, 'The Canterbury Tales'

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

laphamsquart: Geoffrey Chaucer wrote a wry injunction to his own scribe, threatening the curse of scabs on his head, should he not copy the work more correctly.

Kristelh84: I read The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

BrentonDana: 3 of 5 stars to The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

goddessreviews: 4 of 5 stars to Life And Writings Of Geoffrey Chaucer by Seth Lerer

edpearce080759: A 1st edition of Canterbury Tales was sold in 1998 for £4,621,500, breaking the record for the most expensive book. http://t.co/MtWnwvPC6j

edpearce080759: Geoffrey Chaucer was captured by the French during the 100 Years War. King Edward III paid £16 for his ransom. http://t.co/MtWnwvPC6j

edpearce080759: The house where Geoffrey Chaucer was born is now covered by the arrival platform of London's Cannon Street Station. . http://t.co/MtWnwvPC6j

ROCKANGEL86: Forbid us something, and that thing we desire. — Geoffrey Chaucer

welfordwrites: Geoffrey Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales reduced. Tales nineteen to twenty-four. Here are the last six of the Tales, each told in exactly 100 words. Click the link!

welfordwrites: Geoffrey Chaucer's Retraction of his Canterbury Tales. This somewhat strange document seems to be Chaucer making a deal with God to be allowed into Heaven. Click the link!

welfordwrites: The General Prologue to Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. In which Geoffrey Chaucer introduces his amazing array of story-tellers. Click the link!

abbysullvn: i have a love hate relationship with the father of english poetry geoffrey chaucer

Justmurray: “You’re going to need a bigger boat.” Geoffrey Chaucer

SISUShanghai: Today marks the 119th anniversary of the birth of SISU's Professor Roland, C. Fang 方重 who introduced Geoffrey Chaucer to China and Chinese poet TAO Yuanming to the World through his translation & research. He was a pioneering scholar in Middle English & Comparative Literature.

WhenIsBirths: 'Watch out there's a Humphrey about.' Geoffrey Chaucer

welfordwrites: The Second Nun's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. We know very little about this teller of a Canterbury Tale, which recounts the life and death of St Cecilia. Click the link!

NicDakin55: ‘The truth will out ‘ Geoffrey Chaucer

SwoopSquadSG: wine bar in the library you know, drunken scraps over Geoffrey Chaucer

Sami001Haq: "She leet no morsel from hir lippes falle, Ne wette hir fingres in hir sauce depe. Wel coude she carie a morsel, and wel kepe, That no drope ne fille upon hir brest. In curteisye was set ful muche hir lest." ~ Geoffrey Chaucer

Lexxx_Flexx: in this generation Geoffrey Chaucer would’ve got tf cancelled for writing Canterbury Tales cause it definitely would’ve been something satirical about the LGBTQ community in there and they’d be crying

LAComedyAwards: I didn't know twitter is a word invented by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 1500's. I bet he's twittering in his grave.

clarexnewman: Geoffrey “The Rock” Chaucer

birdiegirl192: love is blind Geoffrey Chaucer

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

ISLSPORTS: StSebsNeedham: In Mr. Adam's 10th grade English class, students recited Geoffrey Chaucer's "General Prologue" from The Canterbury Tales in the original Middle English (spoken in Britain in the 1300's). Their 18-line recitation is the 10th-grade class poe…

welfordwrites: The Manciple's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. This is one of the shortest complete Canterbury Tales, being a version of the “tell-tale bird” story formerly told by Ovid. Click the link!

ieropumpkin: and every time i see someone talk abt vision i'm just like hell yea that's geoffrey chaucer

Kristelh84: 29% done with The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer

romasars: Used in a sentence: “And al thys hous of whiche I rede Was made of twigges, salwe, rede And green eke, and somme weren white, Swiche as men to these cages thwite, Or maken of these panyers..." -Geoffrey Chaucer - The House Of Fame

thebrainofchris: OXFORD: After the credits have rolled, Nicholas wipes his arse, coz he did so much farting in that Parish clerk's face that he followed through a little. As he pulls his trousers up Geoffrey Chaucer steps out of the shadows. "I'm here to talk to you, about the Canterbury Tales"

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

Moonflowerz25: 1912 The Complete Poetical Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, Medea's Cauldron - Warwick Goble, British illustrator of children's books

Moonflowerz25: 1912 The Complete Poetical Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, Zenobia Queen of Palmyra - Warwick Goble, British illustrator of children's books

Danenbarger: A Summary and Analysis of Geoffrey Chaucer’s ‘The Knight’s Tale’

TheProdigy998: Time and tide wait for no man. Geoffrey Chaucer

Mark3Ds: Further to post above, a friend draws attention to the anti-semitic “The Prioress’s Tale”, one of the 24 stories in The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer from the late 14th Century

p21_314: “And what is better than wisdom? Woman. And what is better than a good woman? Nothing.” ― Geoffrey Chaucer

RevilFox: A Knight's Tale proves we need a Geoffrey Chaucer cinematic universe.

welfordwrites: The Prioress's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. This Canterbury Tale does not read well today, due to its rabid anti-Semitism. Click the link!

welfordwrites: The Merchant's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. In this Canterbury Tale a young wife and her lover get away with deceiving her elderly, blind husband. The moral message seems a bit confused! Click the link!

supergoodboi: They/Them pronouns have been used historically ever since the first documented use in 1386 in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

BCDreyer: For the skillionth time, “that” is a perfectly fine relative pronoun applied to people, and if you don’t like it you can argue with Geoffrey Chaucer, Ira Gershwin, Rupert Holmes, and moi.

jonahgr33n3: jonah greene book author recommendations 1. Flannery O'Connor 2. James Hilton 3. Franz Kafka 4. Miguel de Cervantes 5. Upton Sinclair 6. Dante Alhigieri 7. John Milton 8. Lovecraft (eh) 9. Geoffrey Chaucer 10. T. S. Elliot 11. Saki (the author) 12. Edmond Rostand

welfordwrites: The Man of Law's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. This is one of the odder Canterbury Tales, involving unlikely coincidences and historical and geographical inaccuracies. Click the link!

RecipesIdeas: Woe to the cook whose sauce has no sting. - Geoffrey Chaucer

conky: (trying to register to vote a second time in order to steal the election) uhh my name is uhh... geoffrey chaucer

tsundoker: 94. The Wife of Bath - Geoffrey Chaucer

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

planksip: Concrete Over Emphasis

ZahidGishkori: Reading *The Prioress* in The Canterbury Tales who is trying to be very well dainty. She has all these funny habits, like singing through her nose, speaking incorrect French,and eating so carefully that she never spills a drop. Thank you Geoffrey Chaucer for writing this.

AffiliateMWare: By nature, men love newfangledness -Geoffrey Chaucer

welfordwrites: An overall view of Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Click the link!

OrganisedPauper: “Patience is a conquering virtue. The learned say that, if it not desert you, It vanquishes what force can never reach; Why answer back at every angry speech? No, learn forbearance or, I’ll tell you what, You will be taught it, whether you will or not.” — Geoffrey Chaucer

trashywaifu: Rqg is a good podcast cos part of their plan to save the world involves geoffrey chaucer, the lich, fighting an ancient gold dragon

goosegustafson: “We know little of the things for which we pay” - Geoffrey Chaucer sponsored Facebook post.

katherineev6: geoffrey chaucer would love the knight’s tale movie adaptation with heath ledger and I’m only convinced of this more and more every time I watch it

welfordwrites: The Physician's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. One of the shorter Canterbury Tales, this is a story of virtue assailed and the assailant punished, and may have been influenced by an incident within Chaucer’s own circle of acquaintances. Click the link!

lordatwar: At Tatts yearling sale day 1: from 1st crop of Justify (Scat Daddy) colt o/o Hourglass, a Galileo 1/2 sis to G1SW & sire Shamardal (Giant’s Causeway) & G2SW Geoffrey Chaucer (Montjeu) from family of Helen Street (dam of Street Cry) brings 450,000 gns from Elliott/McElroy

JoeCrosland: [Bo Burnham voice] Middle English Poetry Born in 1343 Geoffrey Geoffrey Chaucer

BurneJonesArt: Edward Burne-Jones, Illustrations for the Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, 1896

garyrgruber: It was Geoffrey Chaucer who said, "Time and tide wait for no man." This time is your time. Make of it what you will.

welfordwrites: The Clerk’s Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. The story of “patient Griselda”, told on the road to Canterbury, strikes the modern reader as one of gross abuse – and Chaucer might well have agreed with you. Click the link!

welfordwrites: The Summoner’s Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. Two of the Canterbury pilgrims, the Friar and the Summoner, are bitter rivals. This Tale is the Summoner’s revenge for the one previously told by the Friar. Click the link!

JackGardnerBath: ‘He sayd ‘twas the length of a rasher but ‘twas more lyke the width of the rind.’ Said by the ‘gossib’ Alyson, to The Wife of Bath, in The Wife of Bath’s Tale. Geoffrey Chaucer b.1343.

ciacciaesq: Geoffrey Chaucer in the Tinder profile.

welfordwrites: The Friar’s Tale, a Canterbury Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer. The Friar and the Summoner hate each other, so the Friar tells a tale about a wicked summoner. Click the link!

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

planetearthx2: "The Knight's Tale" (Middle English: The Knightes Tale) is the first tale from Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales The first page of Knight's Tale in the Ellesmere manuscript

NiceThingsShow: This weeks Nice Things is in the can, admittedly a little later then we originally planned but it has been quite a week. Be prepared to be whisked from the times of Geoffrey Chaucer to the realm of Uncle Al(s).

welfordwrites: The Cook's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. This Canterbury Tale has hardly started when it stops. Click the link!

welfordwrites: The Franklin's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. This Canterbury Tale poses a dilemma – should a wife keep her word (given in jest) if this means being unfaithful to her husband? Click the link!

soundingline: No one: Absolutely no one: The entire universe, quiet and still: Geoffrey Chaucer: I READ BOETHIUS AND HE'S SUPER IMPORTANT LET ME TELL YOU WHAT I THINK

welfordwrites: Sources used by Chaucer for his Canterbury Tales. It is possible to identify sources for many of the Tales but by no means all. Click the link!

CAStateLibrary: Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales has been censored and banned for over 700 years. Written in the 14th century, this book of satire follows a group of pilgrims who tell stories on their journey to Canterbury Cathedral. Our holding was published in 1934 by Covici Friede, NY,NY.

welfordwrites: The Wife of Bath’s Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. This Canterbury Prologue and Tale opens the “marriage debate” with a plea for the woman to have “mastery” just as the Wife has done several times to her profit. Click the link!

cjenkinsiv: Love Quote of the Day: "Love is blind." - Geoffrey Chaucer

anisashahzadi1: “And what is better than wisdom? Woman. And what is better than a good woman? Nothing.” ― Geoffrey Chaucer

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

indyhayhay: “All Good things must come to an end.” – Geoffrey Chaucer

musiclover_cute: Geoffrey Chaucer exception without a certificate or title, what you need. The Many shadows the Chance You become a great extent, produce students ꧁سٕتّٓآيلٓيّٰ سٕيُٓفًٓيٰٓ كٕوٍدٓ خٕصْمً ꧂ CCC CCC

soundingline: Good morning to everyone except Geoffrey Chaucer

welfordwrites: The Squire's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. This Canterbury Tale builds several elements of a fantasy story and then suddenly stops – nobody knows why! Click the link!

DnD_Lich: [Quote by Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)]

trbtnni: I'm watching that one live for architecture students' contest idk what I'm doing if I have to read Geoffrey Chaucer's Tales...

welfordwrites: The Reeve’s Tale, a Canterbury Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer. The Reeve gets his revenge on the Miller by telling a bedroom farce about a cheating miller. Click the link!

TheEconomist: “London Clay” bounces back from Jack the Ripper to Geoffrey Chaucer by way of Elizabethan theatre, taking in asides on the mishmash of contemporary architecture

EconCulture: “London Clay” bounces back from Jack the Ripper to Geoffrey Chaucer by way of Elizabethan theatre, taking in asides on the mishmash of contemporary architecture

dotQuote: Geoffrey Chaucer: "Love is blind."

SabighterSh: eBook Download The House Of Fame by Geoffrey Chaucer Popular ☛

welfordwrites: The Miller's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. This is one of the best-loved Canterbury Tales, due mainly to its bawdy humour. Click the link!

dailyjewish: The memory of Hugh, and the blame on the Jew, was also significant in literary discourse. In the 14th century the poet Geoffrey Chaucer referred to Little Saint Hugh in The Prioresses’ Tale of the Canterbury Tales, which is one of the most famous texts in English Literary history



Write your comment about Geoffrey Chaucer


Poem of the day

Edith Wharton Poem
The Parting Day
 by Edith Wharton

I.

SOME busy hands have brought to light,
And laid beneath my eye,
The dress I wore that afternoon
You came to say good-by.


...

Read complete poem

Popular Poets