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Flightwoman: Finished with The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer

discernerco: Discover how the text in each work of Geoffrey Chaucer influenced the others.

Flightwoman: 90% done with The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer

sadboipnin: do u ever think about how Chaucer’s first name was Geoffrey and have a minor cardiac emergency when u say “jeff-ree Chaucer” out loud

DnD_Lich: [Quote by Geoffrey Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales)]

joaq3rd: Part of me hopes there’s a “What If” Vision played Geoffrey Chaucer in “A Knight’s Tale” That would be one helluva entrance

_akhilchoudhary: Time and tide waits for none. -Geoffrey Chaucer

Jaysonjonsson69: "BRING HOME THE BACON" -GEOFFREY CHAUCER

FavourAgent007: Have you ever READ The Parson's Tale which is a book written by Geoffrey Chaucer about people who had a tendency to be GREEDY but they didn't know what hit them? In the book, three strong men found A TREASURE CHEST of GOLD, and one of the men goes back to…

forwardnotback: Q6: In the Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer, who is the owner of the Tabard Inn, where the pilgrimage starts, who agrees to travel on the pilgrimage, promising to judge the tales, and disputes between the pilgrims

HunkotDay: Hunk of the Day 1/13/21 ~Paul Bettany as Geoffrey Chaucer in A Knight’s Tale~

LitCrit911: Geoffrey Chaucer is just Kobo Abe for Fishkeeping.

cireneo_: "all good things must come to an end." — Geoffrey Chaucer

AisiAtiti: I randomly think of Geoffrey Chaucer.

JEBWrench: Anyone? Geoffrey Chaucer

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

welfordwrites: The Brothers: a story. Any resemblance to Geoffrey Chaucer’s Pardoner’s Tale is far from coincidental. Click the link!

LitCrit911: Zadie Smith is just Geoffrey Chaucer for Coloring[8].

Beatler: ‘If gold rusts, what then can iron do?’—Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales

Hsquared_Studio: "Shepherds too soft who let their duty sleep, Encourage wolves to tear the lambs and sleep." Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales

paperbacked: this, from Horne's introduction to 'The Poems of Geoffrey Chaucer, Modernized' (1841), has brought me great amusement this morning.

welfordwrites: The Nun's Priest's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. One of the best Canterbury Tales, this is an animal fable in the style of Aesop, and the first example in English literature of the mock-heroic. Click the link!

dvdpeters: “There is full many a man that crieth WAR, WAR that wot full little war remounteth” Soldier and poet Geoffrey Chaucer who served as a man at arms in France during the brutal 100yrs war. He was captured and ransomed for 16 pounds.

TristramShandy0: Amusing and promiscuous, because they represent what people felt and did after the catastrophe of the Bubonic Plague. "Now telleth me, er that ye ferther wende. I can namore, my tale is at an ende." The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer.

TristramShandy0: When reading the Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer, especially mid corona pandemic, I conceptualize a possible aftermath of this lockdown & fear that we're struggling with... Let's consider one particular philosophycal effect the Black Death had on the surviving population..

welfordwrites: The Monk's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. This Canterbury Tale consists of 17 short stories on the theme of “how are the mighty fallen”. Click the link!

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

monsieurparrot: People can die of mere imagination. -Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

GarrythePastor: Early manuscripts, or autographs, are rare. For instance, "The Canterbury Tales" were written between 1387 and 1400 C.E. by Geoffrey Chaucer, a little more than six hundred years ago, and we don't have ...

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

GarrythePastor: Early manuscripts, or autographs, are rare. For instance, "The Canterbury Tales" were written between 1387 and 1400 C.E. by Geoffrey Chaucer, a little more than six hundred years ago, and we don't have ...

HarryMacNChees1: “All good things must come to an end” Geoffrey Chaucer

PhilipGooden: Geoffrey Chaucer and a Florentine murder mystery in the second of the Medieval Blood series, Chaucer and the Legend of Good Women, on UK Amazon Kindle for 99p.

canalbackwards: The Wife of Bath - Geoffrey Chaucer. There was some interesting stuff said but I don’t know why it had to be said like that. Glad I’ve read it but I’m not a big fan of middle english

rwmccollum: “He who dines with the devil needs a long spoon.” -Geoffrey Chaucer Meaning, if you mix with bad people, you should be careful not to be influenced by them. It is a warning not to get too close when dealing with evil people.

infernal_rabbit: Geoffrey Chaucer says education is a right

canalbackwards: who would win in a fight me or geoffrey chaucer

lalarriissaa: All good things must come to an end - Geoffrey Chaucer

heslop_rob: Geoffrey Chaucer turns up at the Tabard Inn, quill in hand. Lockdown. Oh bugger!

ValueTransform: There is an end to everything, to good things as well. ~ Geoffrey Chaucer

triviastorm: Acceptable answers: Geoffrey Chaucer / Chaucer

sburall: If he wasn't called Geoffrey Chaucer someone in comms is going to lose their job...

ImpatientUK: You have 3 days left to see what our favourite Spice Girl/Geoffrey Chaucer lookalike has been cooking up! (spoilers: it's brilliant)

LitCrit911: Arthur Rimbaud is just Geoffrey Chaucer for Howler Monkeys.

KlendathuCap: I'm like Geoffrey Chaucer in a Knight's Tale without the intellect and charisma.

zoa_belolsi: I'm reading Geoffrey Chaucer's Knight's Tale, but all I can think about is kwon hoshi's drunk bro-kissing

welfordwrites: The Second Nun's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. We know very little about this teller of a Canterbury Tale, which recounts the life and death of St Cecilia. Click the link!

welfordwrites: Geoffrey Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales reduced. Tales nineteen to twenty-four. Here are the last six of the Tales, each told in exactly 100 words. Click the link!

welfordwrites: Geoffrey Chaucer's Retraction of his Canterbury Tales. This somewhat strange document seems to be Chaucer making a deal with God to be allowed into Heaven. Click the link!

welfordwrites: The General Prologue to Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. In which Geoffrey Chaucer introduces his amazing array of story-tellers. Click the link!

QuoteText1: Filth and old age, I'm sure you will agree, are powerful wardens upon chastity. - Geoffrey Chaucer

sukhcess: just gonna start talking in middle english at this rate on some geoffrey chaucer flex

JennyLeetsch: June The Wife of Willesden by Zadie Smith “The Wife of Willesden is a riotous twenty-first century translation of Geoffrey Chaucer's classic The Wife of Bath's Prologue, brought to glorious life on the Kilburn High Road.”

LitCrit911: Geoffrey Chaucer is just Richard Scarry for Amateur astronomy.

WmMorrisSocUK: We are sharing this image of ladies dancing printed on vellum, illustrated by Edward Burne-Jones which can be found inside The Kelmscott Chaucer in our collection. ‘The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer now newly imprinted’ was published by William Morris’ Kelmscott Press in 1896. (2/2)

b3n3llis: 1 of 5 stars to The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

DanielOlushola: Another, freed from prison as he'd willed, comes home, his servants catch him, and he's killed. Infinite are the harms that come this way; we little know the things for which we pray." - Arcite, The Knight's Tale; pg 36 - 37 | The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

LitCrit911: Geoffrey Chaucer is just Chinua Achebe for Impostor syndrome.

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

zoa_belolsi: Geoffrey Chaucer describing the Knight: but he was nat gay. me: :(

BowdenA2FinPlan: Time and tide wait for no man. – Geoffrey Chaucer

welfordwrites: The Merchant's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. In this Canterbury Tale a young wife and her lover get away with deceiving her elderly, blind husband. The moral message seems a bit confused! Click the link!

welfordwrites: The Prioress's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. This Canterbury Tale does not read well today, due to its rabid anti-Semitism. Click the link!

rbbadger2: "And specially from every shires ende Of Engelond to Caunterbury they wende, The hooly blisful martir for to seke, That hem hath holpen whan that they were seeke." - Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

n0rareilly: Did Geoffrey Chaucer write fanfic about people in his town and then just brand it as the Canterbury Tales?

Spill_Words: Fortune a poem by Geoffrey Chaucer This wrecched worldes transmutacioun, As wele or wo, now povre and now honour, Withouten ordre or wys discrecioun Governed is by Fortunes errour. But natheles, the lak of hir

AncientLitDude: I also embarked on a complete reading of the Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer. I'm still working on it, but I finished the General Prologue this year, and I've gotten some very kind comments on it.

ShogunXQ: "Time and Tide wait for no man" Geoffrey Chaucer

welfordwrites: The Man of Law's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. This is one of the odder Canterbury Tales, involving unlikely coincidences and historical and geographical inaccuracies. Click the link!

welfordwrites: The Manciple's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. This is one of the shortest complete Canterbury Tales, being a version of the “tell-tale bird” story formerly told by Ovid. Click the link!

TristramShandy0: "Whan that Aprill with his shoures sote, The droghte of Marche hath perced to the rote." - The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. This book is gonna be the end of me. Chaucerian English is known as middle English so I won't be surprised if afterwards I forget the modern one.

BSingwithSeanK: Marked as to-read: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

virtualjustin: It seems my first purchases were paperback copies of Henry Fielding’s “Tom Jones” (28 November 1999) and Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Canterbury Tales” (04 July 1999). Twenty-one years later I’ve still never read either book.

North_Laurel: On page 15 of 448 of The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer: On page 15 but how does ...

op109: williammorrisgallery William Morris’s edition of The Complete Works of Geoffrey Chaucer (1896) took four years to complete. His collaborator, the artist Edward Burne-Jones, was worried they would both die before it was realised. In fact, Morris died just four months later.

AntonKnebenson: Geoffrey Chaucer - The Founder of Our Language

welfordwrites: An overall view of Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Click the link!

louis_phipps: If anyone is wondering what I'm working towards, this is it - a double hander Geoffrey Chaucer. One day

Nightsong_Music: “Before him stands the brawn of tusked swine / And “nowel” [Christmas] crieth every lusty man” (Geoffrey Chaucer). Brawn and boar's head were common for the secular Christmas feast.

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

ChadSchimke: The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer (1387)

catholicdvds: Pilgrimages were once a way of life in Catholic England, recorded in many manuscripts and literary works, most famously in The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer:

welfordwrites: The Physician's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. One of the shorter Canterbury Tales, this is a story of virtue assailed and the assailant punished, and may have been influenced by an incident within Chaucer’s own circle of acquaintances. Click the link!

welfordwrites: The Clerk’s Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. The story of “patient Griselda”, told on the road to Canterbury, strikes the modern reader as one of gross abuse – and Chaucer might well have agreed with you. Click the link!

RecipesIdeas: Woe to the cook whose sauce has no sting. - Geoffrey Chaucer

chaoticlix: and when my english teacher asks me about geoffrey chaucer's classic the canterbury tales during my midterm and i start reciting the entirety of corpse's verse in e-girls are ruining my life which i have word for word in my memory, then what?? then what??? hmm??????

AP_Occupational: 4 of 5 stars to The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

thelibragirll: "The Canterbury Tales" by Geoffrey Chaucer

PhilipGooden: All the Geoffrey Chaucer mysteries now on UK Amazon Kindle at 99p each. Travel virtually and medievally, whatever Tier you’re in, starting with Chaucer and the House of Fame.

welfordwrites: The Friar’s Tale, a Canterbury Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer. The Friar and the Summoner hate each other, so the Friar tells a tale about a wicked summoner. Click the link!

welfordwrites: The Summoner’s Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer. Two of the Canterbury pilgrims, the Friar and the Summoner, are bitter rivals. This Tale is the Summoner’s revenge for the one previously told by the Friar. Click the link!



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Poem of the day

Carl Sandburg Poem
House
 by Carl Sandburg

TWO Swede families live downstairs and an Irish policeman upstairs, and an old soldier, Uncle Joe.
Two Swede boys go upstairs and see Joe. His wife is dead, his only son is dead, and his two daughters in Missouri and Texas don't want him around.
The boys and Uncle Joe crack walnuts with a hammer on the bottom of a flatiron while the January wind howls and the zero air weaves laces on the window glass.
Joe tells the Swede boys all about Chickamauga and Chattanooga, how the Union soldiers crept in rain somewhere a dark night and ran forward and killed many Rebels, took flags, held a hill, and won a victory told about in the histories in school.
Joe takes a piece of carpenter's chalk, draws lines on the floor and piles stove wood to show where six regiments were slaughtered climbing a slope.
'Here they went' and 'Here they went,' says Joe, and the January wind howls and the zero air weaves laces on the window glass.
The two Swede boys go downstairs with a big blur of guns, men, and hills in their heads. They eat herring and potatoes and tell the family war is a wonder and soldiers are a wonder.
One breaks out with a cry at supper: I wish we had a war now and I could be a soldier.
...

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