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nekomatapoetry: Edmund Spenser the dates of his schooling and a remark in one of his sonnets (Amoretti 60) lend credence to the date traditionally assigned, which is around 1552.

nekomatapoetry: Keats puts on display his deep affinity for, emulation of, and modifications to the poetic style and career trajectory of Edmund Spenser.

Chelsie9912: Delphi Complete Works of Edmund Spenser (Illustrated) (Delphi Poets Series Book 16) [NR0JV3Q]

nekomatapoetry: The Faerie Queene is an English epic poem by Edmund Spenser. Genre(s)Epic poem Publication date1590, 1596 LinesOver 36,000 MetreSpenserian stanza

nekomatapoetry: What was John Keats inspired by? John Milton Virgil Edmund Spenser

nekomatapoetry: The Spenserian stanza is a fixed verse form invented by Edmund Spenser for his epic poem The Faerie Queene (1590–96). Each stanza contains nine lines in total: eight lines in iambic pentameter followed by a single 'alexandrine' line in iambic hexameter. ]

yakhaanpa: Shepherd's Calendar - Edmund Spenser

elle_lewiseme: the knowledge that after monday's class i finally get to be done with edmund spenser and his stupid archaisms is the only thing motivating me to do this reading

GCoatalen: Mary Shelley's Faerie Queene?!

GordonTredgold: Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small. - Edmund Spenser

Estel651: Love, War, and Classical Tradition in the Early Modern Transatlantic World: Alonso de Ercilla and Edmund Spenser (Volume 444) [1K8B1V4]

obituary_bot: Edmund Spenser, 47 (English poet, Chief Secretary for Ireland) 1552—1599 Edmund Spenser was an English poet best known for The Faerie Queene, an epic poem and fantastical allegory celebrating the Tudor dynasty and Elizabeth I RIP

4foreveryone: Part of the poetry series: The Faerie Queen by Edmund Spenser…..

Demarcus7210: Edmund Spenser: Essays on Culture and Allegory [4F8UIUR]

DionSchneider62: Delphi Complete Works of Edmund Spenser (Illustrated) (Delphi Poets Series Book 16) [FTXFEGR]

jcolag: Who will not mercy unto others show, how can he mercy ever hope to have? Edmund Spenser

keenessays: Essay examining The Faerie Queen by Edmund Spenser and gender roles. Essay must

_iamkabera_: “Sleep after toyle, port after stormie seas, Ease after warre, death after life, does greatly please.” Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene:

randomflavormtg: "Returne from whence ye came. . . ."-Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene

Veronic45384701: Study Guide for Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene [73UUOVQ]

Sugarfreedom9: “For whatsoever from one place doth fall, Is with the tide unto an other brought: For there is nothing lost, that may be found, if sought.” Edmund Spenser. From The Faerie Queene. Farewell Elizabeth II.

ledner68: Love, War, and Classical Tradition in the Early Modern Transatlantic World: Alonso de Ercilla and Edmund Spenser (Volume 444) [84JZUU0]

danrishel: "Be bold, be bold, and everywhere be bold." Edmund Spenser

Jeremy_boypoet: Sonnet September: This holy season fit to fast and pray by Edmund Spenser

Krystal14062328: Delphi Complete Works of Edmund Spenser (Illustrated) (Delphi Poets Series Book 16) [BDOGAJL]

YeHoShuVaH: "Still as he fled, his eye was backward cast, As if his fear still followed him behind." • EDMUND SPENSER •

InadeBree: ‘One day I wrote her name upon the strand, But came the waves and washed it away: ...’ - Edmund Spenser Amoretti LXXV | Caspar David Friedrich, Monk by the Sea, 1809

GordonTredgold: Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small. - Edmund Spenser

TMSpenser: New Release: Edmund Spenser's Shepheardes Calender (1579) An analyzed facsimile edition Edited by Kenneth Borris

aliterarybot: Sweet Thames, run softly, till I end my song... —Edmund Spenser, Prothalamion

ProvidenciEmard: Edmund Spenser: Essays on Culture and Allegory [TNAYNCS]

RPowlowski51: Study Guide for Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene [XVB2AJT]

LeiXia93: My Love Is Like To Ice ( by Edmund Spenser)

Jovanny138: Delphi Complete Works of Edmund Spenser (Illustrated) (Delphi Poets Series Book 16) [RM8WLAQ]

always0nny: The sovereign beauty which I do admire, Witness the world how worthy to be praised: The light whereof hath kindled heavenly fire In my frail spirit, by her from baseness raised; Edmund Spenser

always0nny: That being now with her huge brightness dazed, Base thing I can no more endure to view; But looking still on her, I stand amazed Edmund Spenser

always0nny: At wondrous sight of so celestial hue. So when my tongue would speak her praises due, It stopped is with thought’s astonishment: And when my pen would write her titles true, Edmund Spenser

always0nny: It ravish’d is with fancy’s wonderment: Yet in my heart I then both speak and write The wonder that my wit cannot endite. Amoretti III: ‘The Sovereign Beauty Which I Do Admire Edmund Spenser

jonniemcaloon: Edmund Spenser vs John Donne

GordonTredgold: Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small. - Edmund Spenser

MateusMBruno: Edmund Spenser "One day I wrote her name upon the strand, But came the waves and washed it away (...) My verse your vertues rare shall eternize And in the heavens write your glorious name: Where whenas death shall all the world subdue, Our love shall live, and later life renew."

aliterarybot: So I unto my selfe alone will sing, The woods shall to me answer and my Eccho ringe. —Edmund Spenser, Epithalamion

kennenji: Camille Paglia addresses major artists and writers such as Donatello, Sandro Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Edmund Spenser, William Shakespeare, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lord Byron, Emily Brontë, and Oscar Wilde.

jembloomfield: "For all that moveth doth in change delight: But henceforth all shall rest eternally With him that is the God of Sabaoth hight. O, that great Sabaoth God, grant me that Sabbath's sight." Edmund Spenser on resounding and punning form.

NickGle10867484: Study Guide for Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene [BCIVCYM]

molochofficial: Author: Edmund Spenser Reason: Queer-baiting (Britomart); actively militated for, participated in, and benefited from Irish genocide; bi-erasure

MotorSal13: Edmund Spenser. Without hesitation. No one likes a kiss-ass.

pktw_12: Edmund Spenser but in a bullshit style

AaronIrber: We also talked about Edmund Spenser if that entices anyone!

jayshelt: "Her nature is all goodnesse to abuse, // And causelesse crimes continually to frame, // With which she guiltlesse persons may accuse, // And steale away the crowne of their good name" (TFQ IV.viii). Edmund Spenser talking about Twitter, probably.

GordonTredgold: Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small. - Edmund Spenser

CrossAuthor: "And painful pleasure turns to pleasing pain." -- Edmund Spenser

culturaltutor: And the same is true of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. Chrétien de Troyes, Thomas Malory, Edmund Spenser, and T.H. White are just four writers, separated by centuries, who told their own version of the Arthurian Romances.

niiiickhenry: Ordered a copy of Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queen so I’d have a long, unfamiliar, narrative poem in English to read at my niblings. Now realizing it’s available on Project Gutenberg. Ah well.

randomflavormtg: "Returne from whence ye came..."-Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene

csysch: getting really mad whenever i think about edmund spenser

georgedance04: Today's poem on Penny's Poetry Blog: Ye wasteful woodes (from "August"), by Edmund Spenser Ye wastefull woodes beare witnesse of my woe, Wherein my plaints did oftentimes resound: Ye carelesse byrds are privie to my cryes, [...]

daniel_j_crumbo: Whenever you find yourself not working on your Magnum Opus, thinking "what difference does it make anyway," just imagine how different the world would be if Edmund Spenser would've finished those last five and a half books of the Faerie Queene.

LandsknechtPike: The Irish were also lauded for their fighting spirit and valor even by their enemies. English poet Edmund Spenser wrote that the Irish soldier "Beareth himself very courageously... Put to a piece or a pike, he maketh as worthy soldier as any nation he meeteth with."

beowulf4719501: Chief Keef’s secret is he been making music since he was 12 & reads poets like Edmund Spenser (same guy who wrote a poem about how Christian’s used magic to control Queen Elizabeth)

GordonTredgold: Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small. - Edmund Spenser

LRBbookshop: the same is true for edmund spenser except for he would have had to live to 405. it could have been his treat for finishing the fairie queene

buttermuseum: An allusion to an association with the poet Edmund Spenser in North Cork: the beautiful Faerie Queen. Find out more in the video on our channel, linked below:

AdeodatusTheLad: “A Gentle Knight was pricking on the plaine, Y cladd in mightie armes and siluer shielde, Wherein old dints of deepe wounds did remaine, The cruell markes of many' a bloudy fielde;” —Edmund Spenser (The Faerie Queene, 1.1-4)

SpearhafocA: That said, it wouldn't be the first time Saint George was folded into Arthurian Legend: Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene presents Saint George as a contemporary of a young Prince Arthur. Also, it's not like anything else in the movie was remotely historically accurate. LOL

jjd_jdjdj: the only real advice was Edmund Spenser ' knowing not to dilute the true race ' IRELAND and he had to disguise it ' through anti Irish sentiment because he couldn't say the TRUTH ' IRELAND ' is ' beyond space and time ' but then some dumb british man was a jew '

jjd_jdjdj: Edmund Spenser ' "sail around ireland" '

GatheringFlavor: "Returne from whence ye came. . . ."—Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene Boomerang Art by Rebecca Guay

CarolinaThinks: 2/2 "...they steal, they are cruel and bloody, full of revenge, and delighting in deadly execution, licentious, swearers and blasphemers, common ravishers of women, and murderers of children." — Edmund Spenser

Salahedsaadouni: The poets' scrolls will outlive the monuments of stone. Genius survives; all else is claimed by death. Edmund Spenser

WeLivetoServe: “Cease foolish man (saide he half wrothfully) To seeke to heare that which cannot be told;” -Edmund Spenser’s Daphnaida

alitttlelife: has anyone read paradise lost and can you give me a quick summary of book one and also compare it to edmund spenser’s the faerie queen and christopher marlowe’s doctor faustus

GordonTredgold: Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small. - Edmund Spenser

archmdmag: New Post: The Lost Tapes of History S2 E27 – Edmund Spenser and the Fairy

PangurBn10: The line of thinking from Edmund Spenser and all the Anglicising Planters throughout Irish history

BookRarities: 1750 1st Edmund Spenser The Faerie Queene 2x Imp Sign Prov Tree Calf 300p (fine)

kateaaaaaa: externalizing mental health issues by creating the Upside Down was very Edmund Spenser of the Duffer Brothers

RiviasHunter: Iambicum Trimetrum By Edmund Spenser Unhappy verse, the witness of my unhappy state, Make thy self flutt'ring wings of thy fast flying Thought, and fly forth unto my love, wheresoever she be: Whether lying restless in heavy bed, or else >

rmunro3: And in the heavens write your glorious name: Where whenas death shall all the world subdue, Our love shall live, and later life renew.’” 3) Amoretti LXXV: One Day I Wrote her Name, Edmund Spenser FOR ELIZABETH BOYLE

RiviasHunter: Amoretti XIII: "In that proud port, which her so goodly graceth" By Edmund Spenser In that proud port, which her so goodly graceth, Whiles her faire face she reares up to the skie: And to the ground her eie lids low embaseth Most goodly temperature ye may descry, >

GordonTredgold: Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small. - Edmund Spenser

rumblemaster3: I am reminded of Sonnet 75 by Edmund Spenser where he tells how his poems have immortalized his wife. He never dies. He will live on in the minds of those that remember him and his channel. I am truly thankful for him. I would have never met so many people without his videos.

quotebread: "Her berth was of the wombe of morning dew, And her conception of the joyous Prime." - Edmund Spenser

TorontoLydia: The Squire of Low Degree by Edmund Spenser and retold by Mary Macleod:

aliterarybot: Sweet Thames, run softly, till I end my song... —Edmund Spenser, Prothalamion

jayshelt: "For seven great heads out of his body grew // An yron brest, and back of scaly bras, // And all embrewd in blood, his eyes did shine as glas" — Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene (I.vii.17)

astrowebs: It's so fitting that Adhemar quoted Edmund Spenser's "he that strives to touch the stars oft stumbles at a simple straw" to William, the "country knight" he sees as no better than a peasant, before beating him into submission.

RiviasHunter: Amoretti XXIII: Penelope for her Ulisses sake By Edmund Spenser Penelope for her Ulisses sake, Deviz’d a Web her wooers to deceave: In which the worke that she all day did make The same at night she did again unreave: Such subtile craft my Damzell doth conceave, >

RiviasHunter: Amoretti LXXV: One Day I Wrote her Name By Edmund Spenser One day I wrote her name upon the strand, But came the waves and washed it away: Again I wrote it with a second hand, But came the tide, and made my pains his prey. "Vain man," said she, "that dost in vain assay, >

JustinHowe: I started reading Edmund Spenser's THE FAERIE QUEENE, and it's making me like ORLANDO FURIOSO even more. It's far better than all the works written by English Protestants in imitation of it!

LoveNeruval: "For sure a foole I do him firmely hold, / That loues his fetters, though they were of gold." - Edmund Spenser

GCoatalen: Spenser?

GordonTredgold: Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small. - Edmund Spenser

lucidashell_: Sonnet of the week. Good ol' 75 by Edmund Spenser ;-)

AdamCurtisBot: Events keep happening that seem inexplicable and out of control. Edmund Spenser, Guyot, Bareboating, Convertible Security, European House Cricket.

vabnt: sorry to edmund spenser (not really) but the rhyme scheme in the faerie queene is Bad

ChloJLol: 12) The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser Reread for my dissertation on bodies, transformation, & disability in the FQ. Particularly enjoyed looking at knight’s armour as prosthesis. This is just an incredible poem, with so much rich weird stuff, BUT it *is* long as balls

starborncarl: "It is the mind that maketh good of ill, that maketh wretch or happy, rich or poor." EDMUND SPENSER



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