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AdaptationBot: This time we are loosely adapting Book 3 of Edmund Spenser's THE FAERIE QUEENE as a kaiju film. It will explore fear and theories of personal identity.

tony_cottone: PART TWO Then came the Autumne all in yellow clad... Edmund Spenser The Faerie Queene

tony_cottone: 8 Full dreadfull thinges out of that balefull booke He red... Edmund Spenser The Faerie Queene

tony_cottone: 4 Begotten by two fathers of one mother, Though of contraie natures each to other ... Edmund Spenser The Faerie Queene

tony_cottone: 5 He little answer'd, but in manly heart His mightie indignation did forbeare, Which was not yet so secret, but some part Thereof did in his frouning face appeare ... Edmund Spenser The Faerie Queene

haag89jgd: Delphi Complete Works of Edmund Spenser (Illustrated) (Delphi Poets Series Book 16) ZK3A0ZW

tony_cottone: There they her sought, and euery where inquired, Where they might tydings get of her estate; yet found they none. But by what haplesse fate, Or hard misfortune she was thence conuayd, And stolne away from her beloued mate, Were long to tell ... Edmund Spenser The Faerie Queene

tony_cottone: PART ONE Then came the iolly Sommer ... Edmund Spenser The Faerie Queene

tony_cottone: 1 And such was he, of whome I hue to tell, The champion of true Iustice, Artegall ... Edmund Spenser The Faerie Queene

Paperbacks_Plus: For whatsoever from one place doth fall, is with the tide unto another brought: For there is nothing lost, that may be found, if sought.” ~Edmund Spenser "The Faerie Queene" (1590) Read by Colonel Brandon (Alan Rickman) to Marianne (Kate Winslet) in movie 'Sense and Sensibility"

AdaptationBot: This time we are loosely adapting Book 4 of Edmund Spenser's THE FAERIE QUEENE as a webcomic. It will explore science and moral anti-realism.

alacrates: Interesting that Elizabethan literature encompassed both types -- Philip Sidney relatively high born (side note: his parents hired John Dee to instruct him in alchemy) while writers like Edmund Spenser & Ben Jonson worked their way to prominence from more humble origins

sekharrajkumar1: Elsa Jenny Donahue Spenser Norton Black Edmund Beck

chaoticbeauty77: in the 'epistle' to his poetic work titled 'shepheardes calendar' edmund spenser says the english speech of country folk who don't mix the langug w french, latin, etc is the purer form of english . he claims this speech has its roots in the language of faire folk...

GordonTredgold: Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small. - Edmund Spenser

WorcCathLibrary: Just some of the poetry books in the library: Vergil Aeneid -a copy of 1517 (Sel A51.10), Frances Ridley Havergal's poetry (Sel C 11,12,13) and an 18thC copy of Edmund Spenser's Faerie Queene (TG2+3).

heidistrawberry: 5 of 5 stars to St. George and the Dragon by Edmund Spenser

AdaptationBot: This time we are loosely adapting Book 5 of Edmund Spenser's THE FAERIE QUEENE as an occult detective television series. It will explore fear and the denial of death.

chang19790704: Elsa Jenny Donahue Spenser Norton Black Edmund Beck

turbarius: Tudor primary sources (post-Reformation and militantly Protestant) reveal a racial and social aversion to the Scythian pastoralism of the Irish. Edmund Spenser, A view of the state of Ireland in the Yeare 1596 (Dublin, 1809).

joeSamad: Elsa Jenny Donahue Spenser Norton Black Edmund Beck

talossiannights: Well, someone on the linguistic stack exchange website gives ‘faerie’ as a pseudoarchaism created by Edmund Spenser on the late sixteenth century. I don’t know enough Spenser to confirm or dispute this but I’ve seen people have strong opinions about which spelling is better.

AdaptationBot: This time we are loosely adapting Book 3 of Edmund Spenser's THE FAERIE QUEENE as a sci-fi action film. It will take aesthetic influence from Swiss Symbolist painting.

abgchaadisini: Elsa Jenny Donahue Spenser Norton Black Edmund Beck

colin_ism: My Brit Lit students read Edmund Spenser’s “The Faerie Queen” and I tried to get them to talk about the text as colonial - since Spenser was willingly helping the crown colonize and starve Irish people WHILE writing a love letter to the Empire. They were NOT having it.

OrganicPeoplePR: PROTHALAMIUM. A pre-wedding ode. Coined (as prothalamion) by 16th- Century English Poet Edmund Spenser. Holy King. English Language. (c.1552-1599.)

GabrielTimothyR: “If there is Justice, there is also Forgiveness, which soothes the anger of remorse and blots out the record of sin.” -Edmund Spenser (paraphrase)

aliterarybot: So I unto my selfe alone will sing, The woods shall to me answer and my Eccho ringe. —Edmund Spenser, Epithalamion

GabrielTimothyR: “He who never tells of his hurts will never find help.” -Edmund Spenser (paraphrased) The actual line is, “Found never help, who never would his hurts impart.”

DiuCrone: 1. Books read in 2023, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene. Allegory in general is not to my taste, but I loved the language, intentionally archaic even for 1590. I believe it's the longest poem in the English language.

yudiyunardi: Elsa Jenny Donahue Spenser Norton Black Edmund Beck

SjMoment: Elsa Jenny Donahue Spenser Norton Black Edmund Beck

danrishel: "Be bold, be bold, and everywhere be bold." Edmund Spenser

GordonTredgold: Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small. - Edmund Spenser

whitney7725: Elsa Jenny Donahue Spenser Norton Black Edmund Beck

USHOTMEDOWN: Edmund Spenser wrote 89 sonnets (each drawing from the daily scripture readings of the Book of Common Prayer) commemorating the courtship of his wife and then a great big ode celebrating their wedding, one of the more noble and Christian poets of the English tradition

Sami001Haq: "Of Hony and of Gaule in loue there is store; The Hony is much, but the Gaul is more." ~ Edmund Spenser

neilsonandrew: The moral of most political stories right now is ‘stay off WhatsApp’. I think this is worth embracing (although my last interaction with WhatsApp was to be sent some Edmund Spenser set to lovely church music…it’s not all bad).

Lolo101M: It is the mind that maketh wretch or happy, rich or poor. - Edmund Spenser

nolan23che: Study Guide for Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene RIMHQV0

_THEREALSANTINO: “It is the mind that maketh good or ill, that maketh wretch or happy, rich or poor.” - Edmund Spenser

SNACKSHACK96: “It is the mind that maketh good or ill, that maketh wretch or happy, rich or poor” - Edmund Spenser

AdaptationBot: This time we are loosely adapting Book 6 of Edmund Spenser's THE FAERIE QUEENE as a space opera television series. It will take aesthetic influence from Arthur Wardle's paintings.

GordonTredgold: Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small. - Edmund Spenser

NetNym: "in the style of Edmund Spenser":

deepconvonet: The poet Edmund Spenser originally created Braggadocio as a personification of boasting in his epic poem The Faerie Queene. As early as 1594, about four years after the poem was published, English speakers began using the name as a general term for any blustering blowhard.

PostFilm: Researching my new book: Archaic English. Reading: Edmund Spenser and the 18th-century book.

grtbooks: Feb. 20 in the Classics: The main belt asteroid 160 Una is discovered by German-American astronomer C. H. F. Peters in 1876. Its name was taken from a character in Edmund Spenser's epic poem The Faerie Queene.

daemon_est_deus: For wisedome is most riches; fooles therefore They are, which fortunes doe by vowes deuize, Sith each vnto himselfe his life may fortunize. Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene (1590)

AlexHeffron20: Edmund Spenser's Wikipedia entry plays down his genocidal credentials. He's apparently one of the greatest English poets. He also wrote that the entire Irish people needed extirpating so that plantations could be established across Ireland.

TJRLife: Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small. Edmund Spenser

ForgottenBeauty: In The Faerie Queen by Edmund Spenser, Acrasia is the Queen & seductress. She would tempt & detain men, especially Knights, in her bower of bliss. Similar to Circe, she would eventually turn them into beasts.

seba_f7: Where whenas death shall all the world subdue Our love shall live, and later life renew. Edmund Spenser - Amoretti, sonnet 75 (1595)

RhymeDoctors: This may be the most popular Valentine verse of all. But who gets credit for writing it? Some say it was inspired by The Faerie Queene's author Edmund Spenser. Others say publisher Joseph Johnson gets the nod. What's your opinion? Poetry is a great way …

MelanieJaxn: "So let us love, dear Love, like as we ought; Love is the lesson which the Lord us taught." ~ Edmund Spenser

MelanieJaxn: "Her angel's face, As the great eye of heaven shined bright, And made a sunshine in the shady place." ~ Edmund Spenser

MelanieJaxn: "Her angel's face, As the great eye of heaven shined bright, And made a sunshine in the shady place." ~ Edmund Spenser

thedylanreview: In the “Articles” section, Harriet Archer draws comparisons between Dylan and Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene. Find it here:

GordonTredgold: Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small. - Edmund Spenser

olumide_bobby: "It is the mind that maketh good or ill, that maketh wretch or happy, rich or poor." EDMUND SPENSER Good morning peeps ❤️

ChalicothereX: Edmund Spenser has a lot to answer for

VeraCausa9: Latin words like daedalo, daedalorum meaning "skillful" derived from Daedalus name. In the English language, 'daedal' was first used in 1590 by Edmund Spenser in Fairie Queene: "All were it Zeuxis or Praxiteles, His daedale hand would fail and greatly faynt"

classicvirtues: Entire affection hateth nicer hands. Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queen Art: Christ Healing the Blind Man, Gioacchino Assereto (c. 1640)

hackersfan95: i *refuse* to believe that Edmund Spenser wasn't jacking off to his own writing while he was working on the Bower of Bliss scenes in the Faerie Queene bro....like i get he was a repressed Protestant or w/e but still

AdaptationBot: This time we are loosely adapting Book 5 of Edmund Spenser's THE FAERIE QUEENE as a martial arts film. It will take aesthetic influence from Arabic miniature.

subguide: And painful pleasure turns to pleasing pain. -- Edmund Spenser

DaanviV: The poets' scrolls will outlive the monuments of stone. Genius survives' all else is claimed by death. - Edmund Spenser Deekshith ARISING WINNER PRIYANKA

LLavitha: The poets' scrolls will outlive the monuments of stone. Genius survives' all else is claimed by death. - Edmund Spenser Deekshith ARISING WINNER PRIYANKA

markscroggins: Today: Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene

classicvirtues: Who can turne the streame of destinee, Or breake the chayne of strong necessitee, Which fast is tyde to Joves eternall seat? The sonnes of Day he favoureth, I see, And by my ruines thinkes to make them great. Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene Canto V

skyturtlepress: Help Us Kickstart the revival of an Epic Poem from the 1590s: Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene

LillieDickins15: Delphi Complete Works of Edmund Spenser (Illustrated) (Delphi Poets Series Book 16) Q7GITWP

Elva38903937: Elsa Jenny Donahue Spenser Norton Black Edmund Beck

AdaptationBot: This time we are loosely adapting Book 2 of Edmund Spenser's THE FAERIE QUEENE as a Senecan tragedy. It will take aesthetic influence from ancient Egyptian art and hieroglyphics.

aufderhar10klvf: Fierce Wars and Faithful Loves: Book I of Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene H8O184H

BookChatWeekly: Edmund Spenser devised the Spenserian Stanza for his epic work The Faerie Queene art by Henry Fuseli (c. 1788) Prince Arthur and the Fairy Queen Kunstmuseum Basel, Switzerland

142857Frog: Prothalamion, Edmund Spencer

AdaptationBot: This time we are loosely adapting Book 1 of Edmund Spenser's THE FAERIE QUEENE as a party game. It will take aesthetic influence from art deco.

pfanderson: Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene: A Prose Rendering by Sky Turtle Press — Kickstarter

angeIsdiee: I want someone to love me like Edmund Spenser loved Elizabeth

MelanieJaxn: Gather the rose of love whilst yet is time. -Edmund Spenser

GordonTredgold: Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small. - Edmund Spenser

robertsnickc: “But nothing new to him was that same pain; Nor pain at all; for he so oft had tried … and lov’d so oft in vain.” ~ Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, 1590

robertsnickc: “But nothing new to him was that same pain; Nor pain at all; for he so oft had tried … and lov’d so oft in vain.” ~ Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, 1590

Singeli6: Be unto her a goodly ornament, And for short time an endlesse moniment. Closing couplet of Edmund Spenser’s Epithalamion, which he wrote for his wife on their wedding day.

markscroggins: Today: Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Books Three and Four (ed. Dorothy Stephens)

Universal_Zone: The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser Shawl Scarf.

TheRabbitRoom: In this episode of The Habit, Jonathan Rogers talks with Rebecca Reynolds about her prose rendering of Edmund Spenser's 1590 epic poem, "The Faerie Queene."

skyturtlepress: We are offering a special group rate for eight days. Read our Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene with friends and enjoy a discount on your set—as well as a free gift.

FredFredSanders: Edmund Spenser on the Trinity.

hane72ahl: Love, War, and Classical Tradition in the Early Modern Transatlantic World: Alonso de Ercilla and Edmund Spenser (Volume 444) P0BCAGH

VitalMuvunyi: There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is a proof against all argument, and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance. That principle is condemnation before investigation;-Edmund Spenser

AuroraAus: I’m excited to help Kickstart this gorgeous new prose rendering of Edmund Spenser’s 1590’s epic poem, The Faerie Queene. Read more at:

Na0_av: Robert Glenister’s voice — Edmund Spenser The Faerie Queene

GordonTredgold: Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small. - Edmund Spenser

dw5s: I backed Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene: A Prose Rendering. It looks like it will be both accessible and beautiful!

haechanworId: the sovereign beauty which i do admire by edmund spenser

Ed__Talks: Edmund Spenser - My Love Is Like to Ice. I think it’s about rejection, others seem to think it’s about how opposites attract. I prefer my interpretation.

hc_haos: "One day I wrote her name upon the strand, But came the waves and washed it away: Again I wrote it with a second hand, But came the tide, and made my pains his prey." - Amoretti LXXV: One Day I Wrote her Name, Edmund Spenser

tansyrr: I'm really excited by this Kickstarter to translate Spenser's The Faerie Queen into readable prose.



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Now, O now, in this brown land
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