Comments about Alan Seeger

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war_poets: 26 February 1915 Alan Seeger writes to his father ‘I was shot a few days ago coming in from sentinel duty. I exposed myself for about two seconds at a point where the communication ditch is not deep enough'

war_poets: 26 February 1916 Alan Seeger writes to a friend ‘The things one poignantly regrets are those which seem to us unnecessary, which, we think, might have been different. This is not my case. My being here is not an accident'

mikeyb7248_burt: SS Sealady, ex Liberty tanker SS Alan Seeger, converted to ore carrier & lengthened at Kure in 1955. Purchased 1959 by Intercoastal Shipping, US flag, renamed, previously SS Bengt H Larson, Liberian flag. Note modified cap to funnel.

mikeyb7248_burt: SS Alan Seeger was built as a Liberty tanker Type Z-ET1-S-C3 by Calship 10.43. Managed for WSA by LA Tanker Operators to 6.46 then American Pacific SS Co to 8.48 when she was laid up in Suisun Bay. In commercial service 1951-67, sold to breakers 1968.

war_poets: 17 February 1915 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘You are quite wrong about my not realizing what I was going into when I enlisted. I had not been living for two years in Europe without coming to understand the situation very well'

war_poets: 1 February 1916 Alan Seeger writes ‘I am in hospital for the first time, not for a wound unfortunately, but for sickness. Funny I should be ill this winter when we are in the rear, whereas I passed the last from October to July in the trenches without missing a day.’

kramermj: Back to the Berkeley Folk Music Festival Project (

johnsouthwales: In 1949, Alan Lomax, then working as folk music director for Decca Records, brought Solomon Linda's 78 recording to the attention of his friend Pete Seeger of the folk group The Weavers. In November 1951, after having performed the song for at least a year in their concerts

receditfelis: "I Have a Rendezvous With Death" by Alan Seeger (read by Tom O'Bedlam)

receditfelis: Alan Seeger - Testo della canzone: I Have a Rendezvous with Death

alan_uplc: My three: —Abiyoyo, Pete Seeger (Folk Festival at Newport version) —I Want to Hold Your Hand, The Beatles (Ed Sullivan version) —Star Spangled Banner, Jimi Hendrix (Woodstock version).

_Snape_: Five years ago today, we lost Alan Rickman. He will be missed. Always.

dearsinceres_02: I have a rendezvous with death When spring brings back blue days and fair. (by Alan Seeger)

war_poets: 11 January 1915 Alan Seeger writes 'another bomb came over, which exploded among us with a tremendous detonation. In the confusion that followed the attacking party burst in the door that covered a breach in the wall at this spot and poured a volley into our midst'

war_poets: 5 January 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘I came across another soldier in a black sweater with an American flag pinned to it. I remarked in accosting him that it was the drapeau de mon pays and by so doing made a charming afternoon acquaintance'

war_poets: 31 December 1914 Alan Seeger writes ‘Spent a unique and agreeable kind of Christmas in Cuiry, brightened by thoughtful friends in Paris who sent us all packages laden with everything good to eat and wear. Christmas Day itself was one of the most beautiful of cold winter days

Its_Karanja: I Have a Rendezvous with Death BY ALAN SEEGER I have a rendezvous with Death At some disputed barricade, When Spring comes back with rustling shade And apple-blossoms fill the air— I have a rendezvous with Death When Spring brings back blue days and fair. It may be..

paenvirodigest: Walking Thru Old-Growth Forest At The Alan Seeger Natural Area In Huntingdon County:

war_poets: 27 December 1915 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘the immense secret longing for peace that is the universal undercurrent in Europe now. Only all the nations have waded so deep in blood now that they think it less costly to go right over than to return where they started from'

LSEReviewBooks: 'Bob Dylan’s typewriter. Woody Guthrie’s guitar. Alan Lomax’s Dictaphone machine. Pete Seeger’s hammer. These are a few of the folk musicians and technologies placed front and centre in American Folk Music as Tactical Media'

SuleimanZakie: "I Have a Rendezvous with Death" - Alan Seeger. 1888–1916 (1/3) I have a rendezvous with Death At some disputed barricade, When Spring comes back with rustling shade And apple-blossoms fill the air— I have a rendezvous with Death When Spring brings back blue days and fair.

war_poets: 22 December 1914 Alan Seeger writes ‘Am feeling perfectly happy and contented. This life agrees with me; there will be war for many years to come in Europe and I shall continue to be a soldier as long as there is war.’

war_poets: 19 December 1915 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘you must not worry about lapses like this, for we are not on the front now and will only take part in the big actions, after which I will see that you are notified by telegraph. There is no news here. Life is uneventful.’

war_poets: 14 December 1914 The New York Sun publishes an article by Alan Seeger ‘We have been camping in the woods for the last three days. These intervals of rest between our periods of service in the trenches are usually passed in cantonment at X---, a few kilometers behind the lines.

JacobGarchik: "San Francisco born-and-raised composer Jacob Garchik’s spiraling “Storyteller” weaves snippets of Seeger’s singing and speaking voice, riffing on subjects as varied as his work with ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax and Marlene Dietrich’s take on 'Where Have All the Flowers Gone?'. "

war_poets: 8 December 1914 An article by Alan Seeger is published in the New York Sun ‘This our fourth period of service in the trenches since coming to the front a month ago. We left our camp in the woods down by the chateau before daybreak this morning'

bristolkev: Loving this old BBC Christmas radio show featuring a bunch of communist folk singers like Peggy Seeger, Ewan MacColl, Dominic Behan, Alan lomax and others

war_poets: 4 December 1914 Alan Seeger writes ‘Back in the same trenches […] The trenches have been much improved by the last section. The roof has been made water-tight, more barbed-wire has been strung in front, and the earth out of the deepened ditches has been piled round the walls'

war_poets: 30 November 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘I cannot congratulate myself enough on my foresight in choosing to stay with the Legion instead of going into the 170me with the other Americans... it seems they are still on the front in Champagne, in the same desolate sector'

dchote: I picked up some framed artwork from a local artist Art Heim. Love them! The tree scene is Alan Seeger Nature Area, where I regularly take my kids. The other piece is print on canvas, which is then mounted to board and varnished. Go check out his work:

robertpuff: “I learned by transcribing songs out of the Library of Congress collection in Washington where I was working. I got a job when I just turned twenty in 1939 and Alan [Lomax] needed some help. I listened to hundreds of records every week.” — Pete Seeger

war_poets: 17 November 1914 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘Unfortunately I left my MS with a printer in Bruges, which is now in the hands of the Germans and the center of the fiercest fighting. After the war I shall return there and look it up.’

ItsNura: One trembling opportunity for joy "I Loved..." -Alan Seeger

NoamAssouline: I have a rendezvous with Death At some disputed barricade, When Spring comes back with rustling shade And apple-blossoms fill the air— I have a rendezvous with Death When Spring brings back blue days and fair. Alan Seeger (published posthumously in 1917)

HarlingReads: I Have a Rendezvous with Death - Alan Seeger poem reading | Jordan Harling Reads

war_poets: 10 November 1914 Alan Seeger writes ‘Fifth day of our second period in the trenches. Five days and nights of pure misery. [..] It is a miserable life to be condemned to, shivering in these wretched holes, in the cold and the dirt and semi-darkness'

VolokhC: [Sasha Volokh] Poetry Monday and Veterans Day Special!: "I Have a Rendezvous with Death" by Alan Seeger

war_poets: 9 November 1915 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘Your letter naturally made me unhappy, for it is only in thinking of you that any possible doubts can rise in my mind about having done well in coming here.’

FoxTerriblis50: Memorial Plaque to Alan Seeger, buried in a communal Grave at Lihons National Cemetery. His most famous lines, "I have a rendevous with death at some disputed barricade..." The Bell in Belloy church was given by his parents, his voice still sounding over the land he came to love

MonthRemember: Day 7 - 'I Have a Rendezvous with Death' by Alan Seeger If you can, please consider making a donation to the Royal British Legion using the link below:

war_poets: 4 November 1914 Alan Seeger writes in his diary ‘Back in Cuiry again. Darkness would hardly begin for a fusillade would start from the lines near by, the cry of “Aux armes, aux tranchées!” would run from door to door'

war_poets: 30 October 1915 Having been reported in American newspapers as missing/killed in the Battle of Champagne, Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘I am writing to you in a little café amid the best of comrades. You must take heart thinking of me as always content and really happy'

AliceSchultz67: War has its horrors, but has this of good— That its sure processes sort out and bind Brave hearts in one intrepid brotherhood And leave the shams and imbeciles behind. -- Alan Seeger, Sonnet 9: "On Returning to the Front After Leave"

war_poets: 29 October 1914 Alan Seeger writes ‘Hope to go into the trenches tonight; they are only four kilometers over the hill from here. We have come to the point where fighting is the only thing to do.’

war_poets: 28 October 1914 Alan Seeger ‘For twenty minutes or so the rifle and mitrailleuse fire was continuous, broken every few seconds by the booming of the artillery, while magnesium lights were shot off from the trenches to light up the battle field. Very impressive in the darkness'

war_poets: 27 October 1915 Alan Seeger ‘We passed a magnificent review yesterday before King George, President Poincaré, Joffre, and Kitchener – our glorious Moroccan division and I do not know how many others of Colonials – myriads of troops all returned from the battlefield in Champagne.’

war_poets: 25 October 1914 Alan Seeger writes ‘we sat a long time on the grassy knolls, watching the lines across the valley. Aeroplanes circled continually overhead on reconnaissance and were bombarded with shrapnel from the lines below, without any apparent damage.’

war_poets: 25 October 1915 Alan Seeger describes his part in the battle in Champagne ‘The afternoon of the 28th should have been our turn. We had spent four days under an almost continual bombardment. The regiment had been decimated, though many of us had not fired a shot.'

war_poets: 23 October 1914 Alan Seeger writes in his diary ‘There were three graves by the roadside at a place where we stopped, a post above each and a placard reading: ‘Espion, traitre à son pays. [Spy, a traitor to his country]’.

war_poets: 23 October 1914 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘I am feeling fine, in my element, for I have always thirsted for this kind of thing, to be present always where the pulsations are liveliest. Every minute here is worth weeks of ordinary experience.’

war_poets: 22 October 1914 Alan Seeger writes in his diary at Verzy ‘the sergeant returned and announced the extraordinarily unexpected news that we were to stay in Verzy till four o’clock and then leave immediately for the trenches that are only five or ten kilometres beyond here.'

war_poets: 20 October 1914 Alan Seeger ‘All our way has been one immense battle-field, little villages that are nothing but heaps of ruins, fields torn with artillery fire and heaped with the fresh graves of the soldiers, buried where they fell, a rude cross above and the kepi rouge.'

cybursnake: *apologies. mbube means lion in zulu. alan lomax heard mbube and played it for his friend pete seeger, and he made his own version "wimoweh", with no credits to solomon. solomon recieved 10 shillings as compensation (87 cents today)-

ham_sculpture: Alan Seeger (1888-1916), Mary Aldis Taylor Brush, 20th century

CaptivHistory: Poet Alan Seeger volunteers in French army history thisdayinhistory

dchote: Took my kids to Alan Seeger Natural Area this morning. Great drive!

war_poets: 17 October 1914 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘I go into action with the lightest of light hearts … I am happy and full of excitement over the wonderful days that are ahead.’

jprapke: I Have a Rendezvous With Death by Alan Seeger I have a rendezvous with Death At some disputed barricade When Spring comes back with rustling shade And apple blossoms fill the air. I have a rendezvous with Death When Spring br…

WarrenSenders: I remember Pete's poem, "The Torn Flag," recalling his uncle Alan Seeger in its first line: "At midnight in a flaming angry town I saw my country's flag lying torn upon the ground. I ran in and dodged among the crowd, And scooped it up, and scampered out to safety. 12/

macron_ebooks: Honoring the American poet Alan Seeger, who fought and died for France in Independence Day, July 4th 1916.

war_poets: 11 October 1914 Alan Seeger writes ‘This morning comes the unexpected news of the fall of Antwerp. This is the most important event of the war to date. It means the entire subjugation of Belgium. The Germans, as far as I can see, occupy all the territory they have coveted'

leonaa01: The popular understanding of Alan Lomax is that he had only a fleeting organizational association with the Communist Party, which ended fairly early. Pete Seeger, a longtime friend of Lomax, however, offers a different account...

war_poets: 4 October 1914 Alan Seeger writes ‘Last night two Germans were found in the woods near here by a patrol. One was dead from hunger and exposure and the other nearly so. He said the reason they had not surrendered was that their officers had told them that they would be shot.

war_poets: 4 October 1915 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘The regiment has been in the big action in Ch--- from the beginning – our brigade was the second to leave the trenches. Have been eight days under terrific shell fire. Have taken many prisoners.’

paolo5432: Alan Seeger -- I have a rendezvous with Death

war_poets: 28 September 1914 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘I hope you see the thing as I do and think that I have done well, being without responsibilities and with no one to suffer materially by my decision'

war_poets: 27 September 1914 In Toulouse, Alan Seeger writes in his diary ‘Fifth Sunday since enlistment. The arbor of a little inn on the highroad running east from Toulouse. Beautiful sunny afternoon. Peace. The stir of the leaves; noise of poultry in the yards near by'

MonardaB: Looking at the book on the web, I see that Mr. Leonard reports that Pete Seeger accused Alan Lomax of being a "secret member of the Communist party", whatever that may mean -- perhaps there is a date & source for this quote by Seeger? I couldn't find it.

war_poets: 24 September 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘We are to attack tomorrow morning. I have been waiting for this moment for more than a year. It will be the greatest moment of my life. I shall take good care to live up to it.’

war_poets: 23 September 1915 Alan Seeger writes'helped disinter three men who had been buried alive. They had taken refuge in a deep trench that had been dug for the purpose. But a big shell had fallen right beside this trench and covered the unfortunate men with dirt.'

war_poets: Alan Seeger writes 'we will halt to reform, while the entire 8th Corps, including numerous cavalry, will pass through the breach we have made. These will be sublime moments; there are good chances of success and even of success without serious losses.’

seeger_07: missing alan rickman.

LarsSchall: JFK's favorite poem: "For at least a decade, JFK’s favorite poem had been Rendezvous, a celebration of death. Rendezvous was by Alan Seeger, an American poet killed in World War One. The poem was Seeger’s affirmation of his own anticipated death."

chaddare: Evan Valdez 21 pass from Alan Karrfalt. Pass failed. Seeger 7, Covington 6 with 315 left in the 1st quarter

chaddare: Duncan Keller 47 yard pass from Alan Karrfalt. Karrfalt run. Seeger 35, Covington 14 with 330 left in the 2nd quarter

war_poets: 18 September 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘Here, illumined by the German fusées that shot up continually from their trenches a mile or so off, lay the vast battlefield that in a few days is to see one of the most tremendous actions ever fought.'

Taittinger_FR: Learn more about the acquisition of the poem 'Champagne' from Alan Seeger by Champagne Taittinger

pecunium: Two iconic poems, from two wars (High Flight, and WW1's "I have a rendevous with Death" by Alan Seeger) were written by Americans who joined the respective fights before the US.

earth_on_fleek: Quiet afternoon hike on the Alan Seeger Trail, Huntingdon, PA. [OC][5184 x 3456]

PaisajesIn: Quiet afternoon hike on the Alan Seeger Trail, Huntingdon, PA. [OC][5184 x 3456] from EyeDontNoWhy via Paisajes Increibles.

leonaa01: Want to know what was in the FBI files of Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Alan Lomax, Bess Lomax, Cisco Houston, Burl Ives, Oscar Brand, Josh White, Paul Robeson, & others? The Folk Singers & the Bureau’ was able to obtain them all.

venetianblonde: Alan Seeger was born in New York City and died at the Somme in 1916. He was 28. His nephew Pete sang songs of love, resistance, and peace. Alan Seeger was a hero, not a loser, not a sucker. "I Have A Rendezvous With Death," by Alan Seeger.

DebraFBloom: 11/11/2018 "Alan Seeger and the soldiers and marines of Belleau Wood ... dutifully made their rendezvous; to his eternal shame, Donald Trump failed his."

PaulAlgu12: "Now turn we joyful to the great attacks, Not only that we face in a fair field Our valiant foe and all his deadly tools, But also that we turn disdainful backs On that poor world we scorn yet die to shield— That world of cowards, hypocrites, and fools." - Alan Seeger

war_poets: 1 September 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘Great and unexpected news this morning at report. All American volunteers in the Legion are to be given the privilege of entering a French regiment. […] I have chosen the 133e de ligne, whose depot is at Belley'

CatilinaSergius: I have a rendezvous with Death At some disputed barricade, When Spring comes back with rustling shade And apple-blossoms fill the air—... ...And I to my pledged word am true, I shall not fail that rendezvous. - Alan Seeger

war_poets: 28 August 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘I have pleasant memories of Alsace […] The people are quite German in all outward aspects. The young men are serving in the German army; their little brothers and sisters are learning the “Marseillaise” in the village school.’

jfoster58: Literary footnote: "On August 24, 1914, the American poet Alan Seeger volunteers for service in the French Foreign Legion during the First World War."

jfoster58: “I have a rendezvous with Death At some disputed barricade, When Spring comes back with rustling shade And apple-blossoms fill the air — I have a rendezvous with Death When Spring brings back blue days and fair."--Alan Seeger

TimeTraveler017: Poet Alan Seeger volunteers in French army

war_poets: 24 August 1914 Alan Seeger joins the French Foreign Legion so he could fight for the Allies.

war_poets: 24 August 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘Likelihood of an offensive in Alsace is not so good now. The reason we came here was to put in six days’ work on the second line defenses, each regiment in the division doing its turn. This done, we return, they say, to Plancher-Bas!’

debjshaw: 1914 August 24 Poet Alan Seeger volunteers in French army On August 24, 1914, the American poet Alan Seeger volunteers for service in the French Foreign Legion during the First World War. Born in New York City in…

LucyLondon7: Alan, uncle of the singer Pete Seeger, was included in an exhibition remembering some of the poets involved in The Somme Offensive in 1916

mcnaughtongunn: August 24, 1914: Poet Alan Seeger volunteers in French army

war_poets: 21 August 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘In Alsace at last. […] Crossed the old frontier line without demonstration. German road posts. Immediate change in architecture; picturesque houses with white plaster walls and inset beams. The people all speak German and very bad French.

war_poets: 20 August 1915 Alan Seeger writes from Vétrine, near Belfort ‘The boom of the cannon can be heard, more distant now, in Alsace. Two captive balloons are up along the line of the front. An aeroplane returns toward Belfort from a reconnaissance beyond the lines.'

war_poets: 19 August 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘We are to leave tomorrow, probably for the Front!’

war_poets: 16 August 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘Forty kilometers away could be seen indistinctly the factory chimneys and church spires of Mulhouse. We saw also the Harmannsweilerkopf, where such fierce fighting has taken place this last winter'

war_poets: 14 August 1917 Ivor Gurney writes to Marion Scott ‘We cannot hear the guns at this place, but the flashes are clear enough; to remind us of the reason why we sleep on straw and not “pillowed in silks and scented down” as Alan Seeger wrote.’



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Poem of the day

Charles Baudelaire Poem
Le Voyage
 by Charles Baudelaire

A Maxime Du Camp
I

Pour l'enfant, amoureux de cartes et d'estampes,
L'univers est égal à son vaste appétit.
Ah! que le monde est grand à la clarté des lampes!
Aux yeux du souvenir que le monde est petit!

...

Read complete poem

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