Comments about Alan Seeger

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war_poets: 24 June 1916 Alan Seeger writes to his godmother ‘we started off in the heat of the day on what was without exception the hardest march I have ever made. There were 20 kilometers to do through the blazing sun and in a cloud of dust. Something around 30 kilos on the back.'

war_poets: 23 June 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘A very quiet sector here, with practically no artillery nor rifle fire. There seems to be a kind of entente not to shoot on either side.'

LomaxArchive: At the 1950 Midcentury Int'l Folklore Conference, Lomax encouraged scholars to take advantage of the new LP format to publish and promote the folk songs of all the world’s peoples. Only Charles Seeger was interested. “They made me so mad,” Alan said, “I decided to do it myself.”

arqios: Today in history On the 22nd of June 1664 Katherine Philips passes away [London, United Kingdom] On the 22nd of June 1888 Alan Seeger is born in New York [New York, United States]

war_poets: 22 June 1888 Alan Seeger is born in New York City

LucyLondon7: WW1 soldier poet Alan Seeger - America's Rupert Brooke - was born on 22nd June 1888

war_poets: 21 June 1916 Alan Seeger writes ‘Tomorrow take the train for an unknown destination. Fine hot summer weather. The big attacks will come soon. Wish us good success. It is very exciting to be on the move at last, and I am happy and contented.’ The letter contained his last poem.

momen_akoud: In the 1950's, during the folk revival movement in America, a copy of Mbube ended up in New York and it was found by folklorist Alan Lomax. He handed it to a folk singer named Pete Seeger who recorded a new version called wimoweh. It was a major hit.

war_poets: 20 June 1915 In Châlons-sur-Vesle Alan Seeger writes 'In the distance could be heard the rifle shots and the occasional booming of cannon, but here all is peaceful and quite normal.’

war_poets: 19 June 1915 Alan Seeger writes from Magneux ‘Many civilians here and conditions apparently quite normal. Saw electric lights and railroad trains for the first time in eight months.

war_poets: 18 June 1915 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘Everybody should take part in this struggle which is to have so decisive an effect, not only on the nations engaged but on all humanity. There should be no neutrals but everyone should bear some part of the burden.’

war_poets: 18 June 1916 Alan Seeger writes to his godmother ‘No village to buy things and have afterdinner coffee in, but very beautiful surroundings, quiet walks to muse in, pear, and for material comforts milk and eggs can be bought at the chateau now.’

war_poets: 15 June 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘Nothing but good can befall the soldier, so he plays his part well. Come out of the ordeal safe and sound, he has had an experience in the light of which all life thereafter will be three times richer and more beautiful'

war_poets: 15 June 1916 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘We shall probably go back for a short repos before the big attacks which should not be far off now. I am not going to write you any more at length before these big events come off.'

vernon_w_cisney: And I to my pledged word am true, I shall not fail that rendezvous. ~Alan Seeger

war_poets: 13 June 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘Back in the heroic battle field of the Aisne, with its ruins in the villages and ancient trenches in the field...It seems the Germans, the morning after the attack, paraded their prisoners on the crest opposite the French.’

war_poets: 10 June 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘There is a continuous fusillade at night and the echoes that crackle back from the woodsides and distant hills, in all kinds of fantastic modulations, never have time to die into a complete calm'

AfshanIsani: Alan Seeger. But I’ve a rendezvous with Death At midnight in some flaming town, When Spring trips north again this year, And I to my pledged word am true, I shall not fail that rendezvous.

war_poets: 4 June 1916 Back from six days in the trenches, Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘the Germans became aggressive at times and approaching our posts under cover of the forest in broad daylight took pot shots at our sentinels, without however doing any damage'

war_poets: 4 June 1916 Alan Seeger writes to his godmother ‘The last rumor is that we are soon to go to Verdun to relieve drawing the 2nd Moroccan division. That would be magnificent, wouldn’t it – the long journey nearer and nearer to that furnace'

war_poets: 3 June 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘It is pleasant here where we are in close contact with the French soldiers, the 38th Chasseurs, the 86th Territorials and the 411 de ligne. Not much likelihood of action, for all that is happening now is around Arras.’

war_poets: 1 June 1916 Alan Seeger writes to his godmother ‘we are again in the little camp where Colette was killed. Strange how quickly one forgets here on the front. For a few days after that the disaster the men kept to the abris, but now we are again careless as before'

MacDowell1907: "Ode in Memory of the American Volunteers Fallen for France" by Alan Seeger (MF 12), to have been read before the statue of Lafayette and Washington in Paris, on Decoration Day, May 30, 1916.

alan_smithee_jr: Omg I found it!

JohnWesleyBush1: “There, holding still, in frozen steadfastness, Their bayonets toward the beckoning frontiers, They lie—our comrades—lie among their peers, Clad in the glory of fallen warriors, Grim clustered under thorny trellises.” -Alan Seeger, Ode in Memory of American Volunteers

war_poets: 29 May 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘The lines here are so near that the two sides can talk to each other easily. We told them a few nights ago that Italy had declared war and they yelled back: “Yes, but against you!” Won’t they be furious when they learn the truth!’

CoffeewClassics: Today we are continuing our commemoration of Memorial Day weekend by sharing another poem by one of the "War Poets" of the First World War who died before the end of the war -- today, our selection is from the American, Alan Seeger, "I Have a Rendezvous …

randi_vet: I have a rendezvous with Death’ by Alan Seeger 1/5 I have a rendezvous with Death At some disputed barricade, When Spring comes back with rustling shade And apple-blossoms fill the air – I have a rendezvous with Death When Spring brings back blue days and fair.

David_L_Cullen: "Under the little crosses where they rise ⁠The soldier rests. Now round him undismayed The cannon thunders, and at night he lies ⁠At peace beneath the eternal fusillade . . ." — from 'Champagne, 1914-15' by Alan Seeger (1888-1916), an American poet killed in action in WWI.

markmyoungman: I Have a Rendezvous with Death - Alan Seeger

war_poets: 25 May 1915 Alan Seeger writes from Puisieulx ‘Marched here over the plains and are to spend six days here in third line and then go up to the first, near the Ferme d’Alger. An important sector with the trenches very close.’

war_poets: 24 May 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘Left Cuiry-les-Chaudardes after almost seven months on the Aisne. Were replaced by the 34ème that came over from Beaurieux. […] Leave tonight for the trenches.’

war_poets: 23 May 1916 Alan Seeger writes to his godmother ‘I and a few others are going to try to get permission to go out on patrouilles d’embuscade and bring in some live prisoners. It would be quite an extraordinary feat if we could pull it off.’

war_poets: 23 May 1916 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘Nothing more adorable in Nature than this daybreak in the northeast in May and June. One hears the cockcrows in the villages of that mysterious land behind German lines. Then the cuckoos begin to call in the green valleys'

war_poets: 22 May 1915 The New York Sun publishes Alan Seeger’s latest article ‘Night of violent attacks. All yesterday we listened to the hum of aeroplanes overhead and watched them cruising about amid their little satellites of shrapnel puffs'

war_poets: 22 May 1916 Alan Seeger writes two sonnets about Bellinglise, the chateau where he is barracked.

war_poets: 19 May 1916 Alan Seeger on the aftermath of an airplane bombing ‘Havoc in our little camp that had been so peaceful. Air full of dust & smell of powder, ground littered with leaves & branches, tents, clothes, equipment, riddled with holes, ground splashed & trailed with blood

war_poets: 13 May 1916 Alan Seeger writes to his godmother ‘The chateau, in the grounds of which we are barracked, has a most beautiful name – Bellinglise. Isn’t it pretty? I think I shall have to write a sonnet to enclose it, as a ring is made express for a jewel.’

war_poets: 12 May 1916 Alan Seeger writes ‘I have sat long musing on these beautiful vistas and wondering what is going on in those lost cities and villages of the north, where three and a half million French have been living for almost two years now'

war_poets: 10 May 1915 Alan Seeger writes to his mother after the sinking of the Lusitania ‘I cannot understand the American state of mind, nor why Americans have the temerity to venture into a declared war-zone, much less let their wives and children go there'

war_poets: 28 April 1915 The New York Sun publishes Alan Seeger’s article ‘what is there for one to say who belongs to those units that have only been waiting inactive, preparing for the great events that advancing spring ought to be bringing nearer and nearer?’

NickelsOnTrail: Future project locations include Parker Dam State Park, the Appalachian Trail, Alan Seeger Natural Area, Corn planter State Forest, and Shawnee State Park.

Dave_willbury: just learned that pete seeger was an intern for alan lomax?!

war_poets: 15 April 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘it is an altogether curious sensation to recline here in an easy-chair, reading some fine old book, and just taking the precaution not to stay in front of the glassless windows through which the sharpshooters can snipe at you'

war_poets: 13 April 1916 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘These visits to the rear confirm me in my conviction that the work up there on the front is so far the most interesting work that a man can be doing at this moment, that nothing else counts in comparison.’

WoodyGuthrieCtr: ["Introduction," Alan Lomax, Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Hard Hitting Songs for Hard-Hit People. New York: Oak Publications, 1967, (originally written in 1941), 15-20.]

illinoispilgrim: "But I've a rendezvous with Death At midnight in some flaming town, When Spring trips north again this year, And I to my pledged word am true, I shall not fail that rendezvous." - Alan Seeger, 1917

illinoispilgrim: "I have a rendezvous with death At midnight in some flaming town ...and I to my pledged word am true I shall not fail that rendezvous." - Alan Seeger

wtul_playlist: Just played: Alan Feinberg - Crawford Seeger: Piano Study in Mixed Accents (The American Innovator)

war_poets: 24 March 1915 The New York Sun publishes an article by Alan Seeger ‘Among so many hours in the soldier’s life that modern warfare makes monotonous and unromantic there come those too when the heart expands with accesses of enthusiasm'

Shot_fox: ‘But I’ve a rendezvous with Death At midnight in some flaming town.’ By the American war poet Alan Seeger, who died on the Somme with the French Foreign Legion in 1916. It strikes me as so apposite this tragic Spring …

ScalzisWar: -is as bad as my ability to characterize and personify. Each time I read it I find more I want to change. Well, I don't hate it, it is a milestone of progress out of technical writing, so I'll take what points I can get. All credits to the real life Alan Seeger for his work.

bkesling: “God knows 'twere better to be deep Pillowed in silk and scented down, Where Love throbs out in blissful sleep, Pulse nigh to pulse, and breath to breath, Where hushed awakenings are dear ...” -Alan Seeger, “I Have a Rendezvous with Death”

war_poets: 12 March 1915 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘From today on, no more letters nor correspondence of any kind goes out until further notice. As this rule seems to apply to all regiments, it is probably motivated by military reasons.'

rajoyceUCB: —Alan Seeger, “I Have a Rendezvous with Death”

war_poets: 7 March 1916 Alan Seeger writes to his mother from Biarritz, where he is convalescing ‘I hope you got my letters from the hospital soon enough to be reassured about my not being at Verdun. This ought to have been a comfort to you. Of course, to me it is a matter of great regret'

settofaze: Pete Seeger's Uncle, and apparently one of JFK's favourite poems. "I Have a Rendezvous with Death" by Alan Seeger. He kept his word, and was killed in WWI.

war_poets: 3 March 1915 Alan Seeger sends a postcard showing French infantry ‘Here is the way we look marching, l’arme à la bataille. After six days repose we are going back again to the trenches tonight.’

kreuger62: Ukraine now - war WW1 poetry: I have a rendezvous with Death At some disputed barricade, When Spring comes back with rustling shade And apple-blossoms fill the air I have a rendezvous with Death When Spring brings back blue days and fair. Alan Seeger

GBCofC: I Have A Rendezvous I Will Keep “And just as it is appointed for man to die once” (Hebrews 9:27a ESV). Alan Seeger wrote the poem, “I Have a Rendezvous With Death” before his death in WWI. “I have a rendezvous with Death … And I to my pledged word...

war_poets: 26 February 1916 Alan Seeger writes to a friend ‘The things one poignantly regrets are those which seem to us unnecessary, which, we think, might have been different. This is not my case. My being here is not an accident'

war_poets: 26 February 1915 Alan Seeger writes to his father ‘I was shot a few days ago coming in from sentinel duty. I exposed myself for about two seconds at a point where the communication ditch is not deep enough'

Rachelschmid: Revisiting the works of Alan Seeger, the American poet who joined the French Foreign Legion during WWI. In “I Have a Rendezvous with Death” he wrote about the inevitability of death in war, a thought that crossed the minds of many who fought. Seeger died fighting July 4, 1916.

bkesling: Esteeming less the forfeit that he paid Than undishonored that his flag might float Over the towers of liberty, he made His breast the bulwark and his blood the moat. - Alan Seeger, “Champagne, 1914-15”

ThamesChoral: Once in the US, Shirley and Alan travel overland to California, to the Berkeley Folk Festival; “…appearing alongside Pete Seeger, Jesse Fuller and Sam Hinton, who could whistle and sing at the same time.” The sleeve on this Hinton LP for children is simply jaw-dropping.

war_poets: 17 February 1915 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘You are quite wrong about my not realizing what I was going into when I enlisted. I had not been living for two years in Europe without coming to understand the situation very well'

WBSDfm: Johnson Boys by Alan Lomax and Peggy Seeger

war_poets: 1 February 1916 Alan Seeger writes ‘I am in hospital for the first time, not for a wound unfortunately, but for sickness. Funny I should be ill this winter when we are in the rear, whereas I passed the last from October to July in the trenches without missing a day.’

GarretLebois: “God knows ’twere better to be deep Pillowed in silk and scented down, Where love throbs out in blissful sleep, Pulse nigh to pulse, and breath to breath, Where hushed awakenings are dear... But I’ve a rendezvous with Death” —Alan Seeger - 1888-1916, (actual poet)

NotcommieCapt: At midnight in some flaming town, When Spring trips north again this year, And I to my pledged word am true. I shall not fail that rendezvous." Alan Seeger's, American National last poem before dying at the Battle of Somme 1916 Remember America entered WW1 1917.....

war_poets: 11 January 1915 Alan Seeger writes 'another bomb came over, which exploded among us with a tremendous detonation. In the confusion that followed the attacking party burst in the door that covered a breach in the wall at this spot and poured a volley into our midst'

Mohamma16828435: by Alan Seeger PUBLIC WINNER UMAR RIAZ

war_poets: 5 January 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘I came across another soldier in a black sweater with an American flag pinned to it. I remarked in accosting him that it was the drapeau de mon pays and by so doing made a charming afternoon acquaintance'

AdamCurtisBot: Alan Seeger will always betray you.

war_poets: 31 December 1914 Alan Seeger writes ‘Spent a unique and agreeable kind of Christmas in Cuiry, brightened by thoughtful friends in Paris who sent us all packages laden with everything good to eat and wear. Christmas Day itself was one of the most beautiful of cold winter days

dstanisad: The best gift my Jodubongsho friends gave me was introducing to Dylan, Seeger, Mohiner Ghoraguli and Baez. Frankly speaking, till 12th standard, I used to loathe western music like anything (apart from a few songs of Beatles, Celine Dion and Alan Jackson)

war_poets: 27 December 1915 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘the immense secret longing for peace that is the universal undercurrent in Europe now. Only all the nations have waded so deep in blood now that they think it less costly to go right over than to return where they started from'

langlcy: shin would recite i have a rendezvous with death by alan seeger

war_poets: 22 December 1914 Alan Seeger writes ‘Am feeling perfectly happy and contented. This life agrees with me; there will be war for many years to come in Europe and I shall continue to be a soldier as long as there is war.’

war_poets: 19 December 1915 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘you must not worry about lapses like this, for we are not on the front now and will only take part in the big actions, after which I will see that you are notified by telegraph. There is no news here. Life is uneventful.’

LSEReviewBooks: 'Bob Dylan’s typewriter. Woody Guthrie’s guitar. Alan Lomax’s Dictaphone machine. Pete Seeger’s hammer. These are a few of the folk musicians and technologies placed front and centre in American Folk Music as Tactical Media'

war_poets: 14 December 1914 The New York Sun publishes an article by Alan Seeger ‘We have been camping in the woods for the last three days. These intervals of rest between our periods of service in the trenches are usually passed in cantonment at X---, a few kilometers behind the lines.

war_poets: 8 December 1914 Alan Seeger writes ‘[we] marched up the hill in single file under the winter stars. Passing the second line trenches we walked for some time down a road, torn up here and there with shell holes and obstructed now and then with shattered trees.’

war_poets: 4 December 1914 Alan Seeger writes ‘Back in the same trenches […] The trenches have been much improved by the last section. The roof has been made water-tight, more barbed-wire has been strung in front, and the earth out of the deepened ditches has been piled round the walls'

JohnnieKG: But I've a rendezvous with Death At midnight in some flaming town, When Spring trips north again this year, And I to my pledged word am true, I shall not fail that rendezvous. BY ALAN SEEGER

war_poets: 30 November 1915 Alan Seeger writes ‘I cannot congratulate myself enough on my foresight in choosing to stay with the Legion instead of going into the 170me with the other Americans... it seems they are still on the front in Champagne, in the same desolate sector'

ShaunLKelly1955: Alan Seeger, American poet, French Legion soldier.

war_poets: 17 November 1914 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘Unfortunately I left my MS with a printer in Bruges, which is now in the hands of the Germans and the center of the fiercest fighting. After the war I shall return there and look it up.’

jphyabene: I found myself reading Alan Seeger's "I have a rendezvous with death" poem over and over again today. It could have been anyone of us today, but we made it out alive. Let's be respectful and honor the innocent that perished today.

FoxTerriblis50: The French Cemetery at Lihons, France. Alan Seeger is buried there. "I have a rendevous with death at some disputed barricade......." An American by birth, he joined the French Foreign Legion. He was fatally wounded in the attack on Belloy-en-Santerre - on 4th July, 1916.

war_poets: 10 November 1914 Alan Seeger writes ‘Fifth day of our second period in the trenches. Five days and nights of pure misery. [..] It is a miserable life to be condemned to, shivering in these wretched holes, in the cold and the dirt and semi-darkness'

war_poets: 9 November 1915 Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘Your letter naturally made me unhappy, for it is only in thinking of you that any possible doubts can rise in my mind about having done well in coming here.’

war_poets: 4 November 1914 Alan Seeger writes in his diary ‘Back in Cuiry again. Darkness would hardly begin for a fusillade would start from the lines near by, the cry of “Aux armes, aux tranchées!” would run from door to door'

war_poets: 30 October 1915 Having been reported in American newspapers as missing/killed in the Battle of Champagne, Alan Seeger writes to his mother ‘I am writing to you in a little café amid the best of comrades. You must take heart thinking of me as always content and really happy'

war_poets: 29 October 1914 Alan Seeger writes ‘Hope to go into the trenches tonight; they are only four kilometers over the hill from here. We have come to the point where fighting is the only thing to do.’

atm787: P insane that you can do the same work someone like Alan Lomax or Pete Seeger did over the span of years and many miles by literally having a Spotify account and being willing to frantically document your musical listening

war_poets: 28 October 1914 Alan Seeger ‘For twenty minutes or so the rifle and mitrailleuse fire was continuous, broken every few seconds by the booming of the artillery, while magnesium lights were shot off from the trenches to light up the battle field. Very impressive in the darkness'

Windancer2706: Alan and Charles Seeger

war_poets: 25 October 1914 Alan Seeger writes ‘we sat a long time on the grassy knolls, watching the lines across the valley. Aeroplanes circled continually overhead on reconnaissance and were bombarded with shrapnel from the lines below, without any apparent damage.’



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