Comments about Mary Howitt

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GreenCoton: Well done today Year 5/6. Great learning about spiders this morning in preparation for the Poem "The Spider and the Fly" by Mary Howitt, written in 1829. Impressive webs!

publiceyestl: Mary Howitt warned them: And now dear little children, who may this story read, To idle, silly flattering words, I pray you ne’er give heed: Unto an evil counsellor, close heart and ear and eye, And take a lesson from this tale, of the Spider and the Fly.

christiangruber: Unto an evil counsellor, close heart, and ear, and eye, And take a lesson from this tale, of the Spider and the Fly. - Mary Howitt, 1829

mattfredstl: Oh, right. Like Dick's gang would read someone like Mary Howitt.

AHD_212_: 2/2 —And now, dear little children, who may this story read, To idle, silly, flattering words, I pray you ne'er give heed: Unto an evil counsellor, close heart, and ear, and eye, And take a lesson from this tale, of the Spider and the Fly. — Mary Howitt (1829)

SirSteveUK: "Will you walk into my Parler, said the spider to the fly" The Spider and the Fly is a poem by Mary Howitt, published in 1829. The first line of the poem is "'Will you walk into my parlour?' said the Spider to the Fly." The story tells of a spider who traps a fly into its web.

BalajiPrasad_: "Will you walk into my parlour?" said a spider to a fly; ... The way into my parlour is up a winding stair "Oh no, no!" said the little fly, "to ask me is in vain, For who goes up your winding stair can ne'er come down again." ~ Mary Howitt, The Spider and the Fly

valhalla4119: “Will you walk into my parlour?” said the Spider to the Fly.... Mary Howitt

carylloper: For visions come not to polluted eyes ~ Mary Howitt

robertsnickc: There’s silence in the harvest field; And blackness in the mountain glen, And cloud that will not pass away From the hill-tops for many a day; And stillness round the homes of men. Mary Howitt

robertsnickc: There’s silence in the harvest field; And blackness in the mountain glen, And cloud that will not pass away From the hill-tops for many a day; And stillness round the homes of men. Mary Howitt

DrAgabaken: He who gave them hardships And a life of care, Gave them likewise hardy strength And patient hearts to bear. - Mary Howitt

KarenTink6: "Will you walk into my parlor," said the Spyder (sp) to the Fly. "Tis the prettiest little parlor you ever did Spy!" The way into my parlour is up a winding stair, And I have many pretty things to shew when you are there." (Mary Howitt) /1

shotsremembered: OTD 1978 - Boney M’s bid for the year’s big Christmas hit, ‘Mary’s Boy Child’, sits at Number 1 for the first time, while Aldershot beat Doncaster Rovers 2-1 in Div 4. John Dungworth heads home from an Alan Wooler free kick before Dave Howitt (pic) scores the winning goal

DownandAwayPod: Welp, another day when the true crime community reminds me of Mary Howitt's "The Spider and the Fly."

edithwarhol: “Will you walk into my parlour?" said a spider to a fly. ‘Tis the prettiest little parlour that ever you did spy.” Mary Howitt

katzsupremacy: book titles by picture order: -in a dark, dark room and other scary stories (alvin schwartz) -the spider and the fly (mary howitt) -miraculous journey of edward tulane (kate dicamillo) -The stinky cheese man and other fairly stupid tales (jon scieszka)

dpcassidyC3: “Will you walk into my parlour?” said the Spider to the Fly, ‘Tis the prettiest little parlour that ever you did spy; The way into my parlour is up a winding stair, And I’ve a many curious things to show when you are there.” — The Spider and The Fly, Mary Howitt, 1829

MatschOtto: From "The spider and the Fly," by Mary Howitt “Will you walk into my parlor?” said the spider to the fly; “’Tis the prettiest little parlor that ever you did spy."

ADASpota: English Medium and Visionary artist Georgiana Houghton The Spiritual Crown of Annie Mary Howitt Watts, 1867 (Watercolour)

ADASpota: English Pre-Raphaelite painter, writer, feminist and spiritualist Anna Mary Howitt became a pioneering drawing medium. It is likely the term "automatic drawing" originated with her. Spiritualist Drawing (c.1856)

IamShiaaa_: "And now dear little children, who may this story read, To idle, silly flattering words, I pray you ne’er give heed: Unto an evil counsellor, close heart and ear and eye, And take a lesson from this tale, of the Spider and the Fly." The Spider and the Fly by Mary Howitt

Hockeyfan_52: “Will you walk into my parlor?” said the spider to the fly; “’Tis the prettiest little parlor that ever you did spy. - Mary Howitt

HalifaxNC1776: "Come into my parlor said the spider to the fly"--Mary Howitt, 1829. This week in honor of Halloween we'll be featuring some spooky sights from around the historic site. Happy Halloween from all of us here at Historic Halifax!

lilbookjockey: 209. The Spider and the Fly by Mary Howitt / Tony DiTerlizzi. 4/5 stars. This is a poem that has stuck with me since childhood, so I enjoyed being able to read it in picture book format. There are definitely some lessons to learn about dangerous creatures in here.

profrichmond: And if you have never read the full poem, The Spider and the Fly (1829) by poet, editor and abolitionist Mary Howitt, you can find it here

inf1: “Will you walk into my parlour?” said the Spider to the Fly, “‘Tis the prettiest little parlour that ever you did spy; The way into my parlour is up a winding stair, And I have many curious things to shew when you are there.” - Mary Howitt

HECTURTLE: "Come here pretty fly, with the pearl and silver wing: Your robes are green and purple; there's a crest upon your head; Your eyes are like diamonds bright, but mine are dull as lead" Said the spider to the fly Hearing his flattering words, she came slowly flitting by -Mary Howitt

DannaStaaf: —And now, dear little children, who may this story read, To idle, silly, flattering words, I pray you ne'er give heed: Ignore all evil counsellors, for hidden beaks can stab, And take a lesson from this tale of Octopus and Crab. (homage to Mary Howitt's The Spider and the Fly)

JosephJots: —And now, dear little children, who may this story read, To idle, silly, flattering words, I pray you ne'er give heed: Unto an evil counsellor, close heart, and ear, and eye, And take a lesson from this tale, of the Spider and the Fly. —Mary Howitt

allencarole56: The Spider and the Fly by Mary Howitt and illustrated by Tony Diterlizzi

j_hatala: The Desolation of Eyam By Mary Howitt A poem about actual events that took place in a small 17th century town that quarantined itself during the plague. 1 in 3 died. As bad as it sounds, it's a pleasure to read.

MostlyPrint: "Will you walk into my parlour?" said a spider to a fly. The opening line we all know. Even inspired the B-side of (I can’t get no) Satisfaction by the Rolling Stones. Written by prolific writer and poet, Mary Howitt (1799-1888) friend of the Wordsworths, Tennyson, Dickens et al.

MidlandON: A welcome sight has returned to Midland, as the annual Thanksgiving Display at the corner of Highway 12 and Highway/County Road 93 was completed yesterday afternoon by Mary Howitt and Jesse Graham of the Operations team. Great work!

MelanieJaxn: The Spider turned him round about, and went into his den, For well he knew the silly Fly would soon come back again: So he wove a subtle web, in a little corner sly, And set his table ready, to dine upon the Fly. -Mary Howitt

carylloper: For visions come not to polluted eyes ~ Mary Howitt

TrdisOprtr: "Will you walk into my parlour?" said the spider to the fly; The Spider and The Fly - Mary Howitt

percy_gryce: 25. Mary Howitt, English author and poet

mhenderson33: The words from a poem by Mary Howitt: Will you walk into my parlour? said the spider(Woodward) to the fly.(Trump). Woodward played him like a fiddle.

PrairieMoonNrsy: "Happy are we who hath the power to gather wisdom from a flower" - Mary Howitt

Deserve: For visions come not to polluted eyes. - Mary Howitt

Nickfromupnorth: Georgiana Houghton. The Spiritual Crown of Annie Mary Howitt Watts, 1867.

somequotesbot: "Will you walk into my parlour?" said a spider to a fly;"'T is the prettiest little parlour that ever you did spy." - Mary Howitt

_Representative: There are flowers enough in the summertime, more flowers than I can remember— But none with the purple, gold, and red that dyes the flowers of September! –Mary Howitt

JRGibson: William and Mary Howitt. One of the statues from our walk round Newstead Abbey the other day

MrSteveMatchett: “‘Will you come into my parlor?’ said the spider to the fly.” - Mary Howitt, 1829.

FSensualist: “Will you walk into my parlour?” said the Spider to the Fly, “'Tis the prettiest little parlour that ever you did spy; The way into my parlour is up a winding stair, And I have many curious things to shew when you are there.”......... The Spider and the Fly by Mary Howitt

kevblue777: There are flowers enough in the summertime, More flowers than I can remember: But none with the purple, gold, and red That dyes the flowers of September! –Mary Howitt (1799–1888)

OccultFan: There are flowers enough in the summertime, More flowers than I can remember: But none with the purple, gold, and red That dyes the flowers of September! –Mary Howitt (1799–1888)

platospupil: There are flowers enough in the summertime, More flowers than I can remember: But none with the purple, gold, and red That dyes the flowers of September! –Mary Howitt (1799–1888)

Gabriel88695986: The happiest is the one who has the power to gather wisdom from a flower. Mary Howitt

poetrybyheart: New Poem of the Week: Mary Howitt's Spider and the Fly which we had some amazing recitations of in this year's comp! Every week a poem and an activity to explore it out loud.

poetrybyheart: Poem of the Week: Have fun trying different voices for the 3 speakers in 'The Spider and the Fly' by Mary Howitt. Give it a go on your own or with two friends:

robertsnickc: True delicacy, that most beautiful heart-leaf of humanity, exhibits itself most significantly in little things. Mary Howitt

robertsnickc: True delicacy, that most beautiful heart-leaf of humanity, exhibits itself most significantly in little things. Mary Howitt

Frank_sl8: "God sends children to enlarge our hearts; and to make us unselfish and full of kindly sympathies and affections." -- Mary Howitt

Olaeboh: O, my friend, rise up and follow   Where the hand of God shall lead;   He has brought thee through affliction,   But to fit thee for his need. -Mary Howitt.

platospupil: How pleasant the lives of the birds must be, Living in love in a leafy tree! And, away through the air, what joy to go; And to look on the green, bright earth below. –Mary Howitt (1799–1888)

OccultFan: How pleasant the lives of the birds must be, Living in love in a leafy tree! And, away through the air, what joy to go; And to look on the green, bright earth below. –Mary Howitt (1799–1888)

kevblue777: How pleasant the lives of the birds must be, Living in love in a leafy tree! And, away through the air, what joy to go; And to look on the green, bright earth below. –Mary Howitt (1799–1888)

NorfolkLibs: Today's poem is the Spider and the Fly by Mary Howitt, here illustrated by Tony DiTerlizzi

FlangeCircus: Track 12 on Rural Eerie, ‘The Desolation’, is read and performed by Louise Holloway. This comprises a number of stanzas of the epic poem ‘The Desolation of Eyam’ by Mary Howitt (1827). The last stanza is from Canto II of 'Medicus-Magus’ by Richard Furness (1836).

MelanieJaxn: I know the realms where people say The flowers have not their fellow; I know where they shine out like suns, The crimson and the yellow. - Mary Howitt

TulsaRiverParks: Oh! yes, I love the sunshine! Like kindness, or like mirth, Upon a human countenance, Is sunshine on the earth. Upon the earth - upon the sea - And through the crystal air - Or piled-up-clouds - the gracious sun Is glorious everywhere. Excerpt from "Sunshine" by Mary Howitt

ma_20th: This makes me remember a poem, the Spider and the fly by Mary Howitt.

shmlahriar: parts of "The Spider and the Fly" by Mary Howitt

ElliottBlackwe3: What's your favorite summer read? (art by Mary Botham Howitt)

Museum_Pen: Just finished reading the 3-volume "Cost of Caergwyn", written in 1863 by Mary Howitt. The novel is based on Penmaenmawr and offers a valuable insight to life here during that time. The lack of agency experienced by many of the women in the novel is very depressing :(

AshyoThe: Unto an evil counsellor, close heart, and ear, and eye, And take a lesson from this tale, of the Spider and the Fly. The Spider and the Fly - Mary Howitt 1829

SimonDuring: William Howitt, Tallangetta (1857). Howitt and his wife Mary’s writings open up Victorian culture because of their range and extent. Howitt spent time in Victoria during the 1850s. But I havent read this novel set there: as a physical object, it would be destroyed were I to try.

CreepyCrawly11: “O no, no,” said the little fly, “to ask me is in vain, For who goes up your winding stair can never come down again ...” – Mary Howitt, 1829

koolkopper: God sends children to enlarge our hearts, and make us unselfish and full of kindly sympathies and affections. -- Mary Howitt

carylloper: For visions come not to polluted eyes ~ Mary Howitt

mbesse123: He is happiest who hath power to gather wisdom from a flower -Mary Howitt

Hollypa: The spider and the fly A poem by: Mary Howitt

KellyMcElroy15: "Will you walk into my parlour?" said a spider to a fly; "Tis the prettiest little parlour that ever you did spy." "Oh no, no!" said the little fly, "to ask me is in vain," "For who goes up your winding stair can ne'er come down again." - Mary Howitt (1799–1888)

bay58057608: Book Review 9 The spider and the Fly by Mary Howitt

MelanieJaxn: "Oh! tell me all, my Mary - All, all that ever you know; For you must have seen the fairies Last night on the Caldon Low." - Mary Howitt

GeorgeC863: Trumps Chess game, is detailed, multi layered and sneaky (in a good way). It makes me wonder if this is a web, for Obama & Biden. "Come into my parlor, said the spider to the fly". ;) Mary Howitt (Poet)

JACKIEJORDAN131: The Spider and the Fly is a poem by Mary Howitt, published in 1828. The first line of the poem is "'Will you walk into my parlour?' said the Spider to the Fly." The story tells of a cunning spider who entraps a fly into its web through the use of seduction and manipulation.

craytusjones: In this scene, she's won a long psychological battle with her foe. He's tied to a chair. She slowly crawls toward him across the tabletop as she quotes part of a Mary Howitt poem with the pronouns flipped.

nerites: “Will you walk into my parlour?" said the Spider to the Fly” ― Mary Howitt, The Spider and the Fly

ForArtsSakeUK: ‘Buttercups and daisies- Oh the pretty flowers, Coming ere the springtime To tell of sunny hours. While the trees are leafless, While the fields are bare, Buttercups and daisies Spring up here and there.’ - Mary Howitt

DrAPande: "Will you walk into my parlor?" said the spider to the fly; "'Tis the prettiest little parlor that ever you may spy.” Poem by Mary Howitt. Trump lays a snare for Democratic congress members. If the “reopening” goes bad, he will have more people to blame.

DJAnimations: New project announcement! After11 months of working I'm excited to say that my next short film will be a stop motion adaptation of The Spider and the Fly, a poem by Mary Howitt from 1828 . Here are some early designs…

YoungStoneRiver: The Homes of the New world : impressions of America by Bremer, Fredrika, 1801-1865; Howitt, Mary Botham, 1799-1888

Matt_Greenwings: Daydreaming of freedom... Oh, the white seagull, the wild seagull, A joyful bird is he, As he lies like a cradled thing at rest In the arms of a sunny sea! (C) Mary Howitt

Greedalitism365: The Spider and the Fly is a poem by Mary Howitt (1799-1888), published in 1828. The first line of poem is "'Will you walk into my parlor?' said Spider to the Fly." Story tells of a cunning spider who entraps a fly into its web through the use of seduction and manipulation.

MelanieJaxn: Buttercups and daisies, Oh, the pretty flowers; Coming ere the spring time, To tell of sunny hours. When the trees are leafless; When the fields are bare; Buttercups and daisies Spring up here and there. - Mary Howitt

carylloper: For visions come not to polluted eyes ~ Mary Howitt

PatrickTineo24: The Spider And The Fly

FamFriendPoems: The Spider And The Fly

HallUttoxeter: Another great event at Redfern Cottage, with Mary Howitt performing poetry. Why not pop in...... Sat 14 March, 10am

MelanieJaxn: "Buttercups and daisies, Oh, the pretty flowers; Coming ere the spring time, To tell of sunny hours. When the trees are leafless; When the fields are bare; Buttercups and daisies Spring up here and there." - Mary Howitt

naesbjerg: The Oak-Tree by Mary Howitt (1799 –1888) Sing for the Oak-Tree, The monarch of the wood: Sing for the Oak-Tree, That groweth green and good; That groweth broad and branching Within the forest shade; That groweth now, and yet shall grow When we are lowly laid!

Mhdude1Mhdude1: The Spider and the Fly is a poem by Mary Howitt The first line of the poem is "'Will you walk into my parlour?' said the Spider to the Fly." The story tells of a cunning spider who entraps a fly into its web through the use of seduction and manipulation. Bernie Sanders communism!

Dj_Tchi: Yo Mary Howitt in The Spider and The Fly got got

RudheathPrimary: Year 5 have been editing their descriptive writing today. We described a scene from our story ‘The Spider and The Fly’ by Mary Howitt.



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