Comments about Gerard Manley Hopkins

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poesispoesis: My heart in hiding Stirred for...the achieve of, the mastery of the thing! -- Gerard Manley Hopkins, The Windhover

SallyBayley1: From the age of four when I acquired words I knew there was the visible world, the printed word on the page, and the invisible, the world beyond. From my blog. Love, Sally x

welfordwrites: The originality of Gerard Manley Hopkins. The English poet, who wrote only for himself, had a very unusual writing style. Click the link!

ScottDBryan: What would the world be, once bereft Of wet and of wildness? Let them be left, O let them be left, wildness and wet; Long live the weeds and the wilderness yet. Gerard Manley Hopkins Inversnaid

EyeBrooklyn: Nothing is so beautiful as spring — Gerard Manley Hopkins

poemtoday: Stars and starlight from Gerard Manley Hopkins ...

ThinkingFaith: A Marian reflection for this month of May: Teresa White FCJ reflects on how Jesuit poet Gerard Manley Hopkins articulated the way in which Mary’s own merciful gaze falls upon us.

htfb: What, no reaction at all? After a rare joint study group with the girls' school 6th form their teacher called me "boorish" for my inadequate appreciation of Gerard Manley Hopkins. It rankled. But a bunch of philistines you lot are too.

ICSPublications: ICYMI: Kevin Camillo at National Catholic Register ranks the top poets every Catholic should know including Dante, St. John of the Cross, and Gerard Manley Hopkins.

william_poems: Today’s poem is “I wake and feel the fell of dark, not day” by Gerard Manley Hopkins.

KilcullenDiary: Frankie Gavin for 34th Hopkins Festival.

ourladynmilton: England’s Greatest Catholic Poet Anyone?

Edgardo78151527: England’s Greatest Catholic Poet Anyone?| National Catholic Register

g_kraig: England’s Greatest Catholic Poet Anyone?| National Catholic Register

bernardtjoy: I loved my life. —Gerard Manley Hopkins, last words* *a simple statement that matters in a new way when you consider the source.

orpheus_laments: That Nature Is A Heraclitean Fire And Of The Comfort Of The Resurrection by Gerard Manley Hopkins

VictorianWeb: Such a lovely day here—just the kind Gerard Manley Hopkins must have had in mind when he wrote "Nothing is so beautiful as Spring"

CatholicShareC: England’s Greatest Catholic Poet Anyone?

Predmoresj: Poem: "That Nature is a Heraclitean Fire and of the comfort of the Resurrection" by Gerard Manley Hopkins

BeineckeLibrary: Look at the stars! look, look up at the skies! O look at all the fire-folk sitting in the air! The bright boroughs, the circle-citadels there! The starlight night / Gerard Manley Hopkins ; illustrated by Frederic Prokosch.

BeineckeLibrary: Glory be to God for dappled things – For skies of couple-colour as a brinded cow; For rose-moles all in stipple upon trout that swim; Pied beauty / Gerard Manley Hopkins ; illustrated by Frederic Prokosch.

Kulambq: 'O the mind, mind has mountains; cliffs of fall Frightful, sheer, no-man-fathomed. Hold them cheap May who ne'er hung there.' ~ Gerard Manley Hopkins

Marcie_Hatter: I loved the poetry we did at GCSE and got a lot out of reading it (thanks, Mr. Hoather) but it wasn’t until I did A Level English and we studied Gerard Manley Hopkins’ God’s Grandeur that I thought, ohhhhhhh THIS is what all the fuss is about; this stuff *speaks to you*.

TheLightCollege: 'Nothing is so beautiful as Spring - When weeds, in wheels, shoot long and lovely and lush...' - Gerard Manley Hopkins (Spring)

ideasareeasy: "There lives the dearest freshness deep down things; And though the last lights off the black West went, Oh, morning, at the brown brink eastward, springs, Because the Holy Ghost over the bent World broods! With warm breast and with Ah!! bright wings!!!" - Gerard Manley Hopkins

beatricegroves1: Beautiful bugle. Gerard Manley Hopkins calls thrushes eggs ‘bugle blue.' Bugle is also a 16th century name for decorative glass beads (although, sadly, the Oxford English Dictionary thinks there is no connection between the two).

ThobileThwala: “Your personal boundaries protect the inner core of your identity and your right to choices.” ~ Gerard Manley Hopkins

ThinkingFaith: Today is the anniversary of the death of Emily Dickinson in 1886. In letting the poems of Dickinson and Gerard Manley Hopkins SJ speak to us about faith, can we understand how poetry can lead us closer to God?

TrainingMindful: “Your personal boundaries protect the inner core of your identity and your right to choices.” ~ Gerard Manley Hopkins

ukhistorybooks: Inspirations unbidden: the terrible sonnets of Gerard Manley Hopkins (University of California Press)

girderednerve: when gerard manley hopkins said "all things counter, original, spare, strange" i felt that

HedyKalikoff: “‘What I do is for me: for that I came,’ wrote Gerard Manley Hopkins, a huge fan of Trident Original Flavor.”

welfordwrites: No Worst, There Is None, a poem by Gerard Manley Hopkins. A look at a despair-ridden sonnet that the poet never intended to be read by anyone other than himself.

welfordwrites: Pied Beauty: a poem by Gerard Manley Hopkins. One of Hopkins’s best-loved poems, it offers an excellent example of “sprung rhythm”. Click the link!

IrishArtsCenter: Inspired by Gerard Manley Hopkins' “Pied Beauty,” which celebrates the disparate nature of existence, visual artist Maud Cotter’s upcoming solo retrospective questions the nature of form and physical reality. Theatre installation opens to the public Jun 2:

shantidaffern: You know you are reading an article written by a Jesuit when they make sure to spell out 'Gerard Manley Hopkins, S. J.'

DStreuderst: “…it is true that Tractarians make them for her and find them faintly or only in a few instances borne out for them by her liturgy, and are strongly assailed for their extravagances while they do it…” - Gerard Manley Hopkins 7/7

adamrshields: Brief thoughts on the book, A Heart Lost in Wonder: The Life and Faith of Gerard Manley Hopkins by Catharine Randall

StStephenEC4N: Glory be to God for dappled things – For skies of couple-colour as a brinded cow. (Gerard Manley Hopkins)

schapman_sherry: Summer solstice sunset over the Saint Lawrence River The world is charged with the grandeur of God- Gerard Manley Hopkins

imsorry_jon: "Brute beauty and valour and act, oh, air, pride, plume, here Buckle! AND the fire that breaks from thee then, a billion Times told lovelier, more dangerous, O my chevalier!" - Gerard Manley Hopkins (The Windhover)

SeeKatTweet: I feel like Gerard Manley Hopkins watching a horse "—the achieve of, the mastery of the thing!"

DrMatthewSweet: This is the Two Ronnies sketch Gerard Manley Hopkins would have written

LoneStarMick: From Gerard Manley Hopkins' short poem, 'Spring', which you can read here:

chankilgore: “The world is charged with the grandeur of God.” - Gerard Manley Hopkins

redfearn: The world is charged with the grandeur of God. It will flame out, like shining from shook foil. Gerard Manley Hopkins

daphne_miles: London: Talk on Gerard Manley Hopkins

PaulJJones: Easter isn’t over. Resurrection still matters today in your life and our world. “Let him Easter in us!” Thanks to Gerard Manley Hopkins for using “Easter” as a verb. Love it!

clintballinger: Cartwright chooses a poem strikingly similar to the passage from Bhaskar (1975) to express a similar view (Gerard Manley Hopkins in Cartwright 1999, 19):

indcatholicnews: London: Talk on Gerard Manley Hopkins

ICN_UK: London: Talk on Gerard Manley Hopkins

rrvirdi: Tonight's studies include: the entire Norton anthology of English Literature, every Gerard Manley Hopkins poem, and everything about three certain South Asian mythological monsters, which I cannot share cuz...spoilers. :P :Cracks knuckles:

GBClarkson: Look, look: a May-mess... --Gerard Manley Hopkins, The Starlight Night

dolphinsands: Watching the lambs jump in the field, reading Gerard Manley Hopkins – "the racing lambs too have fair their fling" and "thrush's eggs look like low heavens".

orpheus_laments: To What Serves Mortal Beauty? by Gerard Manley Hopkins

Casey5122dark: Quote of the day: (this one is always apt) “Áh, ás the heart grows older It will come to such sights colder By and by, nor spare a sigh Though worlds of wanwood leafmeal lie; And yet you will weep and know why.” [Gerard Manley Hopkins]

AtcrankA: Pleased to hear that my son's friend Jonah found out about Balzac and laughed delightedly for a long time. Good things are still always happening, what Gerard Manley Hopkins called 'deepdown things'

WomenOfGrace: Let all God’s glory through, God’s glory, which would go Thro’ her and from her flow As if with air: the same Is Mary, more by name, She wild web, wondrous robe, Mantles the guilty globe. -Mary Mother of Divine Grace by Gerard Manley Hopkins Reflection:

pilgrimrose: May Magnificat

Gda1238: "..Well but there was more than this : Spring’s universal bliss Much, had much to say To offering Mary May." (May Magnificat -Gerard Manley Hopkins)

drkarenlord: ‘The Windhover’, by Gerard Manley Hopkins. Poetry as prayer … the contemplation, the depth, the alternating stillness and song.

jenny_kenyon: This May Day not so many milkmaids in Devon, but we do have cherry blossom in the Gerard Manley Hopkins vein…

BelindaGreb: "What would the world be, once bereft Of wet and wildness? Let them be left, O let them be left, wildness and wet, Long live the weeds and the wildness yet." Gerard Manley Hopkins

owobuya: THE MAY MAGNIFICAT MAY is Mary’s Month, Her Feasts follow Reason, Dated due to Season. - Gerard Manley Hopkins, SJ Holy Mary, Mother of God, Pray for Us!

violetpilot1: I caught this morning’s minion, king- dom of daylight’s dauphin, dapple-dawn-drawn Falcon, in his riding Of the rolling level underneath him steady air, and striding High there, how he rung upon the rein of a wimpling wing -- Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-89)

NCRegister: An appreciation of the creative genius of Dante, St. John of the Cross, Alexander Pope, St. Ephrem the Deacon and Gerard Manley Hopkins....

kristafrench: Possibly some of the Gerard Manley Hopkins I found in one of our bookshelves tonight. ❤️

LeoMcKayJr: When asked about the current record rates of COVID deaths, Deeks quoted Gerard Manley Hopkins: “All life death doth end, and each day dies with sleep.” Makes ya think.

Oreilly1Peter: Nothing is so beautiful as Spring –         When weeds, in wheels, shoot long and lovely and lush;             Thrush’s eggs look little low heavens, and thrush          Through the echoing timber does so rinse and wring” Gerard Manley Hopkins .

nihil_evadere: The poet, Gerard Manley Hopkins, was famous for giving up things. As a young man he gave up water for a week, then salt and, some years later, beauty. On becoming Catholic he gave up poetry, first as a trial run during Lent, then for 7 years. Finally, at 44, he gave up the ghost.

jg197316: The war to make yourself be more, do more than you have it in you really to do or to be. I think of that wonderful line from one of the poems of my beloved Gerard Manley Hopkins where he says, “My own heart let me more have pity on.” My own heart let me more have pity on.

Foz89107323: “God’s Grandeur” by Gerard Manley Hopkins.

HeyJudeNotJudy: I made it through "The Wreck of The Deutschland," gamboling through damson and cinquefoil with Gerard Manley Hopkins... B.D McClay says in The Gawker, probably no one will read what WE write in 200 years, yet I'm still reading Gerard 150 years later (but he was a genius).

prsun: Walking and praying in this way, in time, I began to see how time and space are truly “charged with the grandeur of God,” as Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J., put it.

DieMadAboutIt2: "No worst, there is none." - Gerard Manley Hopkins Things can always get worse. No law of nature nor any corollary of same can change that.

guineagibbs: Paging Gerard Manley Hopkins…

EternalEnglish: My most recent poetry reading. 'Pied Beauty' by the English poet, Gerard Manley Hopkins 1844 - 1889

CharlesAFrancis: “Your personal boundaries protect the inner core of your identity and your right to choices.” ~ Gerard Manley Hopkins

roseofmagdala: “Heaven-Haven” by Gerard Manley Hopkins - Classic Poetry with Jonathan R...

rebekahannlamb: Good morning from St Andrews! Bright, boisterous “cobbled foam fleece[d]” (as Gerard Manley Hopkins would say) sea this morning!

yvonnesales78: “Heaven-Haven” by Gerard Manley Hopkins - Classic Poetry with Jonathan R...

poesispoesis: "Hegel understood history as a place of skulls left behind by the spirit [geist/ guest] on the way to itself." Nor mouth had, no nor mind, expressed What heart heard of, ghost guessed -- Gerard Manley Hopkins, Spring and Fall

EternalEnglish: **NEW** My reading of the famous poem. 'Pied Beauty' by the English poet, Gerard Manley Hopkins 1844 - 1889

WordOnFire: Hear actor Jonathan Roumie read classic poetry! This week, Roumie reads “Heaven-Haven” by Gerard Manley Hopkins:

FrSteveGrunow: Take a moment to listen: “Heaven-Haven” by Gerard Manley Hopkins - Classic Poetry with Jonathan R...

callion_chris: At this time of year I get a range of all sorts of injured birds, this poem reminds me in particular of those that haven’t survived and of their domain that we can only imagine, (Gerard Manley Hopkins) my thoughts are of a young thrush that didn’t survive /I called Archie.

CatholicShareC: Episode Twelve: “Heaven-Haven” by Gerard Manley Hopkins – Classic Poetry with Jonathan Roumie

d_catholic: Episode Twelve: “Heaven-Haven” by Gerard Manley Hopkins – Classic Poetry with...

allokton: ”Gather gladness from the skies; Take a lesson from the ground; Flowers do ope their heavenward eyes And a Spring-time joy have found; Earth throws Winter's robes away, Decks herself for Easter Day.” Gerard Manley Hopkins, Easter

dhami: Is there a school where you can learn how to write like Gerard Manley Hopkins

mlcfrench: Still thinking about the marvelous anthem the choir sang yesterday, a setting of "Easter" by Gerard Manley Hopkins to the music of Steven Warner. Amazing.

_ChrisDeWeese: Gerard Manley Hopkins for today

welfordwrites: The originality of Gerard Manley Hopkins. The English poet, who wrote only for himself, had a very unusual writing style. Click the link!

VibeGuy666: I don’t know why people are making fun of this, I actually think this is a pretty interesting deep dive into Updike, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and retaining the capacity for awe and horror within faith

JasonCorn: From the poem “Easter” by Gerard Manley Hopkins, the last two lines: “Henceforth let your souls alway Make each morn an Easter Day.” Christ is risen today as well. Let’s make each day an Easter Day, living in the light and hope of Christ’s resurrection. Happy Monday!

MadsDavies: The two poems quoted: Updike (‘Make no mistake: if He rose at all it was as His body’)

JamesChappel: article worth it for this Gerard Manley Hopkins line: “Let him easter in us, be a dayspring to the dimness of us.”

Kulambq: 'Give myrrhy-threaded golden folds of ease. Your scarce-sheathed bones are weary of being bent: Lo, God shall strengthen all the feeble knees.' ~ Gerard Manley Hopkins, 'Easter Communion'

Kulambq: 'Seek God's house in happy throng; Crowded let His table be; Mingle praises, prayer, and song, Singing to the Trinity. Henceforth let your souls always Make each morn an Easter Day.' ~ Gerard Manley Hopkins, 'Easter'

Edwin7Dean: Seek God's house in happy throng; Crowded let His table be; Mingle praises, prayer, and song, Singing to the Trinity. Henceforth let your souls alway Make each morn an Easter Day. –Gerard Manley Hopkins



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