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BobKindred: As Alfred, Lord Tennyson might have written regarding the Battle of Blustermonger - Facists to right of them Marxists to left of them In to the Valley of Death rode… …well actually not very many moderate decent people at all it seems?

RichSimmondsZA: 'Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all. - Alfred Lord Tennyson

FFELou: "Hope Smiles from the threshold of the year to come, Whispering 'it will be happier'..." - Alfred Lord Tennyson

isc_sa: Tis better to have loved and lost Than never to have loved at all. ― Alfred Lord Tennyson

penny_for: "Hope smiles from the threshold of the year to come, whispering, 'It will be happier.'" -Alfred Lord Tennyson

ladywritealot: better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all. ~Alfred Lord Tennyson

BookRarities: Tennyson Alfred Lord 1809-92 - Tiresias Signed Numbered RARE BOOK In Slipcase

CLRIndia: A Study of the Transvestite(s) Demasculinized in Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s “The Princess” | Contemporary Literary Review India

Yourdailybusi: Self-reverence, self-knowledge, self-control; these three alone lead life to sovereign power. Alfred Lord Tennyson

Fajri_W_: The vow that binds too strictly snaps itself. ~Alfred Lord Tennyson, "The Last Tournament," Idylls of the King

fortune_unix: His honour rooted in dishonour stood, And faith unfaithful kept him falsely true. -- Alfred Lord Tennyson

njoguwambu1: Yet all experience is an arc wherethrough /Gleams that untravelled world, whose margin fades/For ever and ever when I move.-Ulysses by Alfred Lord Tennyson.

FarringfordIOW: Exploring the Isle of Wight with Alfred Lord Tennyson

FarringfordIOW: Tennyson County, A Visit with Alfred Lord Tennyson

FrWilly: "More things are wrought by prayer than this world dreams of." Alfred Lord Tennyson

jhonwlkr666: Tis better to have loved and lost Than never to have loved at all. - Alfred Lord Tennyson

WinnersWisdom: “Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers.” – Alfred Lord Tennyson

mikemodzelewski: “I cannot rest from travel/ I will drink life to the lees.” — Lord Alfred Tennyson

penny_for: "Hope smiles from the threshold of the year to come, whispering, 'It will be happier.'" -Alfred Lord Tennyson

tradesecretsbiz: “Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers.” —Alfred Lord Tennyson

johny2b: The Charge of the Light Brigade by Alfred, Lord Tennyson Half a league, half a league, Half a league onward, All in the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. “Forward, the Light Brigade! Charge for the guns!” he said. Into the valley of Death Rode the six hundred.

lukar14: “‘Tis better to have yahed and yeeted than to never have yahed at all.” - Alfred Lord Tennyson

PetloverHermine: 9Dec/1854: Alfred Lord Tennyson’s poem “Charge of the Light Brigade” is published in The Examiner

iLoveKarJon_: Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all.” — Alfred Lord Tennyson KARJON LightsUpTheBigDome

penny_for: "Hope smiles from the threshold of the year to come, whispering, 'It will be happier.'" -Alfred Lord Tennyson

TheInsp58760917: Alfred Lord Tennyson – Men at most differ as…

mcnaughtongunn: December 9, 1854: “The Charge of the Light Brigade” by Alfred Lord Tennyson is published

362t: "If I had a flower for every time I thought of you, I could walk in my garden forever." Alfred Lord Tennyson

flight_co: Today in history, December 9 1854: Alfred Lord Tennyson’s poem The Charge of the Light Brigade is published in England. 1941: China formally issues a declaration of war against Japan, Germany and Italy. 1976: UN General Assembly calls for Middle East peace conference in Geneva

Samurai0462: In 1848 - American author and creator of "Uncle Remus and Brer Rabbit," Joel Chandler Harris was born. In 1854 - Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem, "The Charge of the Light Brigade," was published in England.

Poem of the day

In The Grass.
 by Robert Crawford

'Tis as if I saw it all — sat now in the grass, and heard
The soft warm wind in my ears like the lilt of a lonely bird;
Sat now in the grasses so — saw, but said never a word.
The two of them in the wood, below me there by the rill;
He with the light on his brow, she in the shadow still;
And a cloud so white goes over the blue on the gleaming hill.
My nest in the grass was good: they deemed that none might see —
Ah God in heaven! my eyes looked out of the hell in me,
...

Read complete poem

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