Sidney Lanier Poems

  • 51.  
    Look off, dear Love, across the sallow sands,
    And mark yon meeting of the sun and sea,How long they kiss in sight of all the lands.
  • 52.  
    To-day the woods are trembling through and through
    With shimmering forms, that flash before my view,Then melt in green as dawn-stars melt in blue.
  • 53.  
    Now haste thee while the way is clear,
    Paul Revere! Haste, Dawes! but haste thee not, O Sun!
  • 54.  
    That air same Jones, which lived in Jones,
    He had this pint about him:He'd swear with a hundred sighs and groans,
  • 55.  
    My crippled sense fares bow'd along
    His uncompanioned way,And wronged by death pays life with wrong
  • 56.  
    Joust First.

  • 57.  
    'Thou Ship of Earth, with Death, and Birth, and Life, and Sex aboard,
    And fires of Desires burning hotly in the hold,I fear thee, O! I fear thee, for I hear the tongue and sword
  • 58.  
    Sail fast, sail fast,
    Ark of my hopes, Ark of my dreams; Sweep lordly o'er the drowned Past,
  • 59.  
    'I saw a sky of stars that rolled in grime.
    All glory twinkled through some sweat of fight,From each tall chimney of the roaring time
  • 60.  
    What heartache -- ne'er a hill!
    Inexorable, vapid, vague and chillThe drear sand-levels drain my spirit low.
  • 61.  
    By Sidney and Clifford Lanier.

  • 62.  
    'Opinion, let me alone: I am not thine.
    Prim Creed, with categoric point, forbearTo feature me my Lord by rule and line.
  • 63.  
    Down mildest shores of milk-white sand,
    By cape and fair Floridian bay,Twixt billowy pines -- a surf asleep on land --
  • 64.  
    Out of the hills of Habersham,
    Down the valleys of Hall,I hurry amain to reach the plain,
  • 65.  
    'To heal his heart of long-time pain
    One day Prince Love for to travel was fainWith Ministers Mind and Sense.
  • 66.  
    Thou God, whose high, eternal Love
    Is the only blue sky of our life,Clear all the Heaven that bends above
  • 67.  
    Trim set in ancient sward, his manful bole
    Upbore his frontage largely toward the sky.We could not dream but that he had a soul:
  • 68.  
    By Sidney and Clifford Lanier.

  • 69.  
    “Spring-germs, spring-germs,
    I charge you by your life, go back to death.This glebe is sick, this wind is foul of breath.
  • 70.  
    I asked my heart to say
    Some word whose worth my love's devoir might pay Upon my Lady's natal day.
  • 71.  
    A white face, drooping, on a bending neck:
    A tube-rose that with heavy petal curves Her stem: a foam-bell on a wave that swerves
  • 72.  
    “I saw a sky of stars that rolled in grime.
    All glory twinkled through some sweat of fight,From each tall chimney of the roaring time
  • 73.  
    Died of a cat, May, 1878.

  • 74.  
    Oft as I hear thee, wrapt in heavenly art,
    The massive message of Beethoven tellWith thy ten fingers to the people's heart
  • 75.  
    If spicy-fringed pinks that blush and pale
    With passions of perfume,-if violets blue That hint of heaven with odor more than hue,-
  • 76.  
    (Killed at Surrey C. H., October, 1866.)

  • 77.  
    Presenting a portrait-bust of the author.

  • 78.  
    Look where a three-point star shall weave his beam
    Into the slumb'rous tissue of some stream,Till his bright self o'er his bright copy seem
  • 79.  
    In o'er-strict calyx lingering,
    Lay music's bud too long unblown,Till thou, Beethoven, breathed the spring:
  • 80.  
    To range, deep-wrapt, along a heavenly height,
    O'erseeing all that man but undersees;To loiter down lone alleys of delight,
  • 81.  
    The Day was dying; his breath
    Wavered away in a hectic gleam;And I said, if Life's a dream, and Death
  • 82.  
    So one in heart and thought, I trow,
    That thou might'st press the strings and I might draw the bowAnd both would meet in music sweet,
  • 83.  
    O marriage-bells, your clamor tells
    Two weddings in one breath.SHE marries whom her love compels:
  • 84.  
    Ploughman, whose gnarly hand yet kindly wheeled
    Thy plough to ring this solitary tree With clover, whose round plat, reserved a-field,
  • 85.  
    I.

  • 86.  
    I.

  • 87.  
    “O Trade! O Trade! would thou wert dead!
    The Time needs heart-'tis tired of head:We're all for love,” the violins said.
  • 88.  
    Death, thou'rt a cordial old and rare:
    Look how compounded, with what care!Time got his wrinkles reaping thee
  • 89.  
    Out of the hills of Habersham,
    Down the valleys of Hall,I hurry amain to reach the plain,
  • 90.  
    “Thou Ship of Earth, with Death, and Birth, and Life, and Sex aboard,
    And fires of Desires burning hotly in the hold,I fear thee, O! I fear thee, for I hear the tongue and sword
  • 91.  
    It was three slim does and a ten-tined buck in the bracken lay;
    And all of a sudden the sinister smell of a man, Awaft on a wind-shift, wavered and ran
  • 92.  
    Our hearths are gone out and our hearts are broken,
    And but the ghosts of homes to us remain,And ghastly eyes and hollow sighs give token
  • 93.  
    By Sidney and Clifford Lanier.

  • 94.  
    In the far North stands a Pine-tree, lone,
    Upon a wintry height;It sleeps: around it snows have thrown
  • 95.  
    Superb and sole, upon a plumed spray
    That o'er the general leafage boldly grew,He summ'd the woods in song; or typic drew
  • 96.  
    Glooms of the live-oaks, beautiful-braided and woven
    With intricate shades of the vines that myriad-cloven Clamber the forks of the multiform boughs,-
  • 97.  
    Then, as the passion of old Gris Grillon
    A wave swift swelling, grew to highest heightAnd snapped a foaming consummation forth
  • 98.  
    Lord Raoul drew rein with all his company,
    And urged his horse i' the crowd, to gain fair viewOf him that spoke, and stopped at last, and sat
  • 99.  
    Lord Raoul was riding castleward from field.
    At left hand rode his lady and at rightHis fool whom he loved better; and his bird,
  • 100.  
    Franciscan friar John de Rochetaillade
    With gentle gesture lifted up his handAnd poised it high above the steady eyes
Total 170 poems written by Sidney Lanier

Poem of the day

The Death Of A Soldier
 by Wallace Stevens

Life contracts and death is expected,
As in a season of autumn.
The soldier falls.

He does not become a three-days personage,
Imposing his separation,
Calling for pomp.

...

Read complete poem

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