Poet Paul Laurence Dunbar

Paul Laurence Dunbar

Paul Laurence Dunbar Poems

  • 1.  
    It's moughty tiahsome layin' 'roun'
    Dis sorrer-laden earfly groun', An' oftentimes I thinks, thinks I,
  • 2.  
    I think that though the clouds be dark,
    That though the waves dash o'er the bark, Yet after while the light will come,
  • 3.  
    Daih 's a moughty soothin' feelin'
    Hits a dahky man, 'Long to'ds night.
  • 4.  
    TO MY FRIEND CHARLES BOOTH NETTLETON
    I
  • 5.  
    Ther' ain't no use in all this strife,
    An' hurryin', pell-mell, right thro' life. I don't believe in goin' too fast
  • 6.  
    Not to the midnight of the gloomy past,
    Do we revert to-day; we look upon The golden present and the future vast
  • 7.  
    Emblem of blasted hope and lost desire,
    No finger ever traced thy yellow page Save Time's. Thou hast not wrought to noble rage
  • 8.  
    W'en us fellers stomp around, makin' lots o' noise,
    Gramma says, "There's certain times come to little boys W'en they need a shingle or the soft side of a plank;"
  • 9.  
    On a summer's day as I sat by a stream,
    A dainty maid came by, And she blessed my sight like a rosy dream,
  • 10.  
    Summah 's nice, wif sun a-shinin',
    Spring is good wif greens and grass, An' dey 's some t'ings nice 'bout wintah,
  • 11.  
    Love me. I care not what the circling years
    To me may do. If, but in spite of time and tears,
  • 12.  
    Hyeah dat singin' in de medders
    Whaih de folks is mekin' hay? Wo'k is pretty middlin' heavy
  • 13.  
    ON THE RECEIPT OF A FAMILIAR POEM
    To me, like hauntings of a vagrant breath
  • 14.  
    Wintah, summah, snow er shine,
    Hit's all de same to me, Ef only I kin call you mine,
  • 15.  
    I sit upon the old sea wall,
    And watch the shimmering sea, Where soft and white the moonbeams fall,
  • 16.  
    DE sun hit shine an' de win' hit blow,
    Ol' Brer Rabbit be a-layin' low, He know dat de wintah time a-comin',
  • 17.  
    THE draft of love was cool and sweet
    You gave me in the cup, But, ah, love's fire is keen and fleet,
  • 18.  
    Dey is snow upon de meddahs, dey is snow upon de hill,
    An' de little branch's watahs is all glistenin' an' still; De win' goes roun' de cabin lak a sperrit wan'erin' 'roun'.
  • 19.  
    AN old man planted and dug and tended,
    Toiling in joy from dew to dew; The sun was kind, and the rain befriended;
  • 20.  
    Pray, what can dreams avail
    To make love or to mar? The child within the cradle rail
  • 21.  
    I don't believe in 'ristercrats
    An' never did, you see; The plain ol' homelike sorter folks
  • 22.  
    Oh, de weathah it is balmy an' de breeze is sighin' low.
    Li'l' gal, An' de mockin' bird is singin' in de locus' by de do',
  • 23.  
    WHAT are the things that make life bright?
    A star gleam in the night. What hearts us for the coming fray?
  • 24.  
    Ain't nobody nevah tol' you not a wo'd a-tall,
    'Bout de time dat all de critters gin dey fancy ball? Some folks tell it in a sto'y, some folks sing de rhyme,
  • 25.  
    I'VE a humble little motto
    That is homely, though it's true, â?? Keep a-pluggin' away.
  • 26.  
    Little Miss Margaret sits in a pout,
    She and her Dolly have just fallen out.
  • 27.  
    De way t'ings come, hit seems to me,
    Is des' one monst'ous mystery; De way hit seem to strike a man,
  • 28.  
    Summah night an' sighin' breeze,
    'Long de lovah's lane; Frien'ly, shadder-mekin' trees,
  • 29.  
    COME away to dreamin' town,
    Mandy Lou, Mandy Lou, Whaih de skies don' nevah frown,
  • 30.  
    I've been list'nin' to them lawyers
    In the court house up the street, An' I've come to the conclusion
  • 31.  
    Bones a-gittin' achy,
    Back a-feelin' col', Han's a-growin' shaky,
  • 32.  
    In this sombre garden close
    What has come and passed, who knows? What red passion, what white pain
  • 33.  
    Key and bar, key and bar,
    Iron bolt and chain! And what will you do when the King comes
  • 34.  
    DO' a-stan'in' on a jar, fiah a-shinin'
    thoo, Ol' folks drowsin' 'roun' de place,
  • 35.  
    Seems lak folks is mighty curus
    In de way dey t'inks an' ac's. Dey jes' spen's dey days a-mixin'
  • 36.  
    Across the hills and down the narrow ways,
    And up the valley where the free winds sweep, The earth is folded in an ermined sleep
  • 37.  
    W'EN us fellers stomp around, makin' lots o' noise,
    Gramma says, 'There's certain times comes to little boys W'en they need a shingle or the soft side of a plank;'
  • 38.  
    Long years ago, within a distant clime,
    Ere Love had touched me with his wand sublime, I dreamed of one to make my life's calm May
  • 39.  
    SINCE I left the city's heat
    For this sylvan, cool retreat, High upon the hill-side here
  • 40.  
    Back to the breast of thy mother,
    Child of the earth! E'en her caress can not smother
  • 41.  
    The word is writ that he who runs may read.
    What is the passing breath of earthly fame? But to snatch glory from the hands of blame--
  • 42.  
    ON a summer's day as I sat by a stream,
    A dainty maid came by, And she blessed my sight like a rosy dream,
  • 43.  
    THOU art the soul of a summer's day,
    Thou art the breath of the rose. But the summer is fled
  • 44.  
    It may be misery not to sing at all,
    And to go silent through the brimming day; It may be misery never to be loved,
  • 45.  
    Ther' ain't no use in all this strife,
    An' hurryin', pell-mell, right thro' life. I don't believe in goin' too fast
  • 46.  
    'In the fight at Brandywine, Black Samson, a giant negro armed with
    a scythe, sweeps his way through the red ranks....' C. M. Skinner's '_Myths and Legends of Our Own Land_.'
  • 47.  
    I GREW a rose once more to please mine eyes.
    All things to aid it â?? dew, sun, wind, fair skies â?? Were kindly; and to shield it from despoil,
  • 48.  
    AFTER READING 'LEAD, KINDLY LIGHT.'
    Lead gently, Lord, and slow,
  • 49.  
    I think that though the clouds be dark,
    That though the waves dash o'er the bark, Yet after while the light will come,
  • 50.  
    TUSKEGEE, ALA., APRIL 22, 1901.
    Not to the midnight of the gloomy past,
Total 522 poems written by Paul Laurence Dunbar

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