Carl Sandburg Poems

  • 51.  
    THE BRIDGE says: Come across, try me; see how good I am.
    The big rock in the river says: Look at me; learn how to stand up. The white water says: I go on; around, under, over, I go on.
  • 52.  
    WRITE your wishes
    on the door and come in.
  • 53.  
    I HAVE ransacked the encyclopedias
    And slid my fingers among topics and titles Looking for you.
  • 54.  
    I SAW a mouth jeering. A smile of melted red iron ran over it. Its laugh was full of nails rattling. It was a child's dream of a mouth.
    A fist hit the mouth: knuckles of gun-metal driven by an electric wrist and shoulder. It was a child's dream of an arm. The fist hit the mouth over and over, again and again. The mouth bled melted iron, and laughed its laughter of nails rattling.
  • 55.  
    ON the one hand the steel works.
    On the other hand the penitentiary. Sante Fe trains and Alton trains
  • 56.  
    THE RIVER is gold under a sunset of Illinois.
    It is a molten gold someone pours and changes. A woman mixing a wedding cake of butter and eggs
  • 57.  
    I painted on the roof of a skyscraper.
    I painted a long while and called it a day's work. The people on the corner swarmed and the traffic cop's whistle never let up all afternoon.
  • 58.  
    Bend low again, night of summer stars.
    So near you are, sky of summer stars, So near, a long-arm man can pick off stars,
  • 59.  
    Bend low again, night of summer stars.
    So near you are, sky of summer stars, So near, a long-arm man can pick off stars,
  • 60.  
    (Washington, August, 1918)I HAVE seen this city in the day and the sun.
    I have seen this city in the night and the moon. And in the night and the moon I have seen a thing this city gave me nothing of in the day and the sun.
  • 61.  
    (For S. A.)TO write one book in five years
    or five books in one year, to be the painter and the thing painted,
  • 62.  
    There is a blue star, Janet,
    Fifteen yearsâ?? ride from us, If we ride a hundred miles an hour.
  • 63.  
    I REMEMBER here by the fire,
    In the flickering reds and saffrons, They came in a ramshackle tub,
  • 64.  
    Pile the bodies high at Austerlitz and Waterloo.
    Shovel them under and let me work--           I am the grass; I cover all.
  • 65.  
    YOUR bony head, Jazbo, O dock walloper,
    Those grappling hooks, those wheelbarrow handlers, The dome and the wings of you, ****,
  • 66.  
    I saw a famous man eating soup.
    I say he was lifting a fat broth Into his mouth with a spoon.
  • 67.  
    The long beautiful night of the wind and rain in April,
    The long night hanging down from the drooping branches of the top of a birch tree, Swinging, swaying, to the wind for a partner, to the rain for a partner.
  • 68.  
    IT is something to face the sun and know you are free.
    To hold your head in the shafts of daylight slanting the earth And know your heart has kept a promise and the blood runs clean:
  • 69.  
    speak, sir, and be wise.
    Speak choosing your words, sir, like an old woman over a bushel of apples.
  • 70.  
    WHAT cry of peach blossoms
    let loose on the air today I heard with my face thrown
  • 71.  
    THERE was a late autumn cricket,
    And two smoldering mountain sunsets Under the valley roads of her eyes.
  • 72.  
    IT'S a lean car ... a long-legged dog of a car ... a gray-ghost eagle car.
    The feet of it eat the dirt of a road ... the wings of it eat the hills. Danny the driver dreams of it when he sees women in red skirts and red sox in his sleep.
  • 73.  
    THE SNOW piles in dark places are gone.
    Pools by the railroad tracks shine clear. The gravel of all shallow places shines.
  • 74.  
    Many things I might have said today.
    And I kept my mouth shut. So many times I was asked
  • 75.  
    THERE'S a hole in the bottom of the sea.
    Do you want affidavits? There's a man in the moon with money for you.
  • 76.  
    Five geese deploy mysteriously.
    Onward proudly with flagstaffs, Hearses with silver bugles,
  • 77.  
    BILBEA, I was in Babylon on Saturday night.
    I saw nothing of you anywhere. I was at the old place and the other girls were there, but no Bilbea.
  • 78.  
    ONE man killed another. The saying between them had been 'I'd give you the shirt off my back.'
    The killer wept over the dead. The dead if he looks back knows the killer was sorry. It was a shot in one second of hate out of ten years of love.
  • 79.  
    I have been in Pennsylvania,
    In the Monongahela and Hocking Valleys.
  • 80.  
    RINGS of iron gray smoke; a womanâ??s steel face â?¦ looking â?¦ looking.
    Funnels of an ocean liner negotiating a fog night; pouring a taffy mass down the wind; layers of soot on the top deck; a taffrail â?¦ and a womanâ??s steel face â?¦ looking â?¦ looking. Cliffs challenge humped; sudden arcs form on a gullâ??s wing in the stormâ??s vortex; miles of white horses plow through a stony beach; stars, clear sky, and everywhere free climbers calling; and a womanâ??s steel face â?¦ looking â?¦ looking â?¦
  • 81.  
    There was a woman tore off a red velvet gown
    And slashed the white skin of her right shoulder And a crimson zigzag wrote a finger nail hurry.
  • 82.  
    IN the newspaper office-who are the spooks?
    Who wears the mythic coat invisible?
  • 83.  
    When the jury files in to deliver a verdict after weeks of direct and cross examinations, hot clashes
    of lawyers and cool decisions of the judge, There are points of high silence--twiddling of thumbs is at an end--bailiffs near cuspidors take fresh
  • 84.  
    Poland, France, Judea ran in her veins,
    Singing to Paris for bread, singing to Gotham in a fizz at the pop of a bottleâ??s cork.
  • 85.  
    The pawn-shop man knows hunger,
    And how far hunger has eaten the heart Of one who comes with an old keepsake.
  • 86.  
    AFTER the last red sunset glimmer,
    Black on the line of a low hill rise, Formed into moving shadows, I saw
  • 87.  
    AFTER the last red sunset glimmer,
    Black on the line of a low hill rise, Formed into moving shadows, I saw
  • 88.  
    AFTER the last red sunset glimmer,
    Black on the line of a low hill rise, Formed into moving shadows, I saw
  • 89.  
    AFTER the last red sunset glimmer,
    Black on the line of a low hill rise, Formed into moving shadows, I saw
  • 90.  
    DID I see a crucifix in your eyes
    and nails and Roman soldiers and a dusk Golgotha?
  • 91.  
    WANDERING oversea dreamer,
    Hunting and hoarse, Oh daughter and mother, Oh daughter of ashes and mother of blood,
  • 92.  
    JABOWSKY'S place is on a side street and only the rain washes the dusty three balls.
    When I passed the window a month ago, there rested in proud isolation: A family bible with hasps of brass twisted off, a wooden clock with pendulum gone,
  • 93.  
    RUM tiddy um,
    tiddy um, tiddy um tum tum.
  • 94.  
    HERE in a cage the dollars come down.
    To the click of a tube the dollars tumble. And out of a mouth the dollars run.
  • 95.  
    DEATH comes once, let it be easy.
    Ring one bell for me once, let it go at that. Or ring no bell at all, better yet.
  • 96.  
    DEATH comes once, let it be easy.
    Ring one bell for me once, let it go at that. Or ring no bell at all, better yet.
  • 97.  
    DEATH comes once, let it be easy.
    Ring one bell for me once, let it go at that. Or ring no bell at all, better yet.
  • 98.  
    DEATH comes once, let it be easy.
    Ring one bell for me once, let it go at that. Or ring no bell at all, better yet.
  • 99.  
    DEATH comes once, let it be easy.
    Ring one bell for me once, let it go at that. Or ring no bell at all, better yet.
  • 100.  
    Seven days all fog, all mist, and the turbines pounding through high seas.
    I was a plaything, a ratâ??s neck in the teeth of a scuffling mastiff. Fog and fog and no stars, sun, moon.
Total 464 poems written by Carl Sandburg

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When the lad for longing sighs,
Mute and dull of cheer and pale,
If at death's own door he lies,
Maiden, you can heal his ail.

Lovers' ills are all to buy:
The wan look, the hollow tone,
The hung head, the sunken eye,
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